concerto

(redirected from concertos)
Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia.
Graphic Thesaurus  🔍
Display ON
Animation ON
Legend
Synonym
Antonym
Related
  • noun

Words related to concerto

a composition for orchestra and a soloist

References in periodicals archive ?
The concertos for piano and orchestra constitute a remarkable component of Martinu's oeuvre, bearing witness to his musical development itself.
Bonet definitely delivers with his masterful natural horn rendition of all of the horn concertos (including the K 494a fragment) and the quintet for horn and strings.
The musicians at Kothen were excellent instrumentalists, and the concertos were written with their virtuosity in mind.
Other concertos interweave the music of soloist and orchestra, creating interesting dialogues, sounds and textures.
Under the baton of Bramwell Tovey, the Toronto Symphony Orchestra will present a program consisting of Beethoven's Fourth Piano Concerto, Saint Saens's Organ Symphony and Stephen Chatman's Over Thorns to Stars.
But its overt lyricism and resemblance to the fiddle concertos of Sibelius and Barber have caused some to disregard the work as insubstantial.
Only about half of Lebrun's concertos were published during his lifetime, probably under some degree of authorial supervision.
Jill Crowther, the other featured oboist, also makes much of the concertos by John Gardner and Kenneth Leighton, composers who followed to some extent in VW's footsteps without actually sounding like him.
The opening movement of the Piano Concerto in A minor, a staple of the piano concerto repertoire and therefore having many alternative rivals, is famous for its dramatic opening drum roll and cascading crescendos from the piano.
It is the greatest cello concerto and arguably the greatest of all concertos,'' he says.
The three-day Michigan Mozartfest held in the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor in November 1989 was just such a forum, mixing a scholarly symposium with concerts of the concertos performed by leading American players on copies of period instruments.
It is, incidentally, extraordinary that there has been no English-language monograph about these concertos (which, according to Boyd, 'enjoy a measure of popularity in Great Britain' unparalleled by any other works by Bach) since 1963.
Telemann: Complete Horn Concertos for horns, strings, and basso continuo.
Selections on the program include "Totentanz" for piano by Franz Liszt, violin concertos by Jean Sibelius and Henryk Wieniawski, cello concertos by Anton'n Dvor[sz]k and Edward Elgar, piano concertos by Francis Poulenc and Sergei Rachmaninoff, a horn concerto by W.
Bohuslav Martinu's concertos are performed by a number of brilliant violinists (Zenaty, Novotny, Zimmermann, Faust, Keulen and others), but only in the case of two have I had the irresistable subjective feeling that this is the real Martinu.