commodious

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  • adj

Synonyms for commodious

Synonyms for commodious

having plenty of room

Synonyms for commodious

large and roomy ('convenient' is archaic in this sense)

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References in periodicals archive ?
Money] is [simply] a machine for doing quickly and commodiously [the exchanges that] would be done, though less quickly and less commodiously [through pure barter] (Mill, 1888 [1848], p.
In actuality, scientist Lee Smolin (quoted by Carrier) argues that the available scientific evidence strongly suggests that the universe is the best, most commodiously designed universe for producing black holes.
Changes are mentioned, though not dwelt upon: Henry's wife, their cousin Eliza de Feullide, died at the end of April; May found him preparing to move from Sloane Street to Henrietta Street; on 15 September Jane Austen writes, from Henrietta Street, that she and her niece Fanny are "most commodiously disposed of" with a bedroom, adjoining dressing room, and "poor Eliza's bed.
It is a machine for doing quickly and commodiously, what would be done, though less quickly and commodiously, without it: and like many other kinds of machinery, it only exerts a distinct and independent influence of its own when it gets out of order.
He further explained that money is basically "a machine for doing quickly and commodiously, what would be done, though less quickly and commodiously without it, and like many other types of machinery, it only exerts a distinct and independent influence of its own when it gets out of order.
campus of the Carmelite mother house in Paris, a most commodiously and
For this purpose she has distributed the materials of manufactures and commerce in various and distant parts of a nation and a world; and they cannot be procured by war so cheaply or commodiously as by commerce; she has rendered the latter the means of extirpating the former.
It was an eighteenth-century publisher, John Stockdale, who first saw the potential for a one-volume Shakespeare, and brought out in 1784 the edition by Samuel Ayscough, who introduced the volume with the comment, "The book now offered to the public may commodiously be taken into a coach or a post-chaise, for amusement on a journey" (118).
It was described as "a graceful palace, very commodiously situated at the easterly end of St James's Park, having at one view a prospect of the Mall & other walks, and of a delightful and spacious canal.