coercion

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  • noun

Synonyms for coercion

Synonyms for coercion

power used to overcome resistance

Synonyms for coercion

the act of compelling by force of authority

Related Words

using force to cause something to occur

References in periodicals archive ?
She said Pakistan need to strengthen its ties with the regional big blocks such Shanghai Cooperation Organization (SCO) and Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) to get their political and economic support to avoid the coercions. She stressed the importance of promoting the soft diplomacy i.e.
Pakistan needs to be stable and strong from the internal side to effectively confront external coercions, otherwise a poor domestic situation would not help achieve foreign policy objectives, he remarked.
She told participants of the seminar on Foreign Policy of Pakistan in Context of Strategic Coercion, organised by the Sustainable Development Policy Institute, that: 'Trade and investments get you towards improved economic ties and diplomatic relations, whereas aid gets you towards strategic coercion.
These coercions define the spectrum that is bounded on one extreme by a setting of utopian peace and the on the other extreme by the offense to humanity that is chattel slavery.
The sole value of law is justice, and thus property law should only admit those property regimes that minimize coercion among the parties with conflicting claims.
He maintains plausibly that the state is "essentially coercive." Its coercions may be justified, however, if they are confined to dealing (to a permissible extent) with illegitimate private coercers.
It is, of course, a monopoly of the use of coercion in the sense that no one else is permitted to use coercion without the government's approval, and the government is permitted (so it thinks) to use coercion against all if they try to do anything it disapproves, including using coercion privately even when it is for purposes the state does approve.
Murray noted that, as written, the Connecticut statute "quite overlooked" the contraceptive industry, which he described as "the real area where the coercions of law might, and ought to, be applied, at least to control an evil...." Although he did not define industry, it usually means producers and distributors.
Religious freedom, according to the Declaration, is immunity from coercion in civil society.
She said this while speaking at a seminar titled 'Understanding Strategic Coercion in the Realm of Grey Hybrid Conflict-Way forward for Pakistan', organized by the Sustainable Development Policy Institute (SDPI), here.
She said strategic coercion in the realm of hybrid warfare imposed by the United States of America (USA) on various countries through economic and military mean has no bases in international laws, whether it was breach of nuclear agreement (Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action) with Iran or backing out from the international agreements (Paris Agreement).
Addressing the audience at a seminar titled 'Understanding Strategic Coercion in the Realm of Grey Hybrid Conflict - Way forward for Pakistan' organized by the Sustainable Development Policy Institute (SDPI) here, Dr Mazari said the hysteria about hybrid warfare is not a new phenomenon, and rather it is old one with changing tools such as fake news, disinformation and propaganda with the purpose of going beyond the truth to disrupt the society.
'The strategic coercion in the realm of hybrid warfare imposed by the United States of America (USA) on various countries through economic and military means has no basis in international laws, whether it is breach of nuclear agreement (Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action) with Iran or backing out from the international agreements (Paris Agreement),' she said.