circumstantial

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Synonyms for circumstantial

Synonyms for circumstantial

characterized by attention to detail

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fully detailed and specific about particulars

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References in periodicals archive ?
Based on DSM-V criteria, the patient was diagnosed with psychotic disorder due to another medical condition having presented with auditory hallucination, paranoid delusion, and disorganized speech (tangentiality and circumstantiality).
Moreover, other signs of formal thought disorder such as illogicality, concrete thinking, and circumstantiality may occur both in schizophrenia and in individuals with borderline intelligence in absence of psychosis.
She had increased tone of speech, circumstantiality, and air of confidence and increased self-esteem.
In Chapter 5, "Idiocy, the Name of God," Johnson extends the implications of the notion of translation to Borges' consideration of the name of God as it appears in "Death and the Compass," "The Aleph," and "The Writing of the God." In the latter, Johnson sees Borges' protagonist Tzinacan bridging the gap between God (absolute immediacy) and the human (absolute circumstantiality).
The length is a challenge to Hannah's critics, many of whom echo Shepherd, who identifies Hannah as "working well" in his shorter stories and getting "caught up in circumstantiality" in his longer ones (71).
This is also the reason why narrative sequences in poems normally do not reach the degree of concrete circumstantiality and detailed elaboration possible and usual in novels.
The notion of the status passage had also been examined with reference to the experiences of gay men as they transitioned through life with HIV and AIDS, where six major interrelated properties of the status passage were identified: reversibility, temporality, shape, desirability, circumstantiality, and multiple status passages (Lewis, 1999; Glaser & Strass, 1971).
Rather than concentrating on types of passages, they examine passages through different variables--reversibility, temporality, shape, desirability, circumstantiality, and multiplicity--followed by chapters on individual, collective, aggregate, and multiple passages.
He moves deftly from subject to subject, with a stress on circumstantiality, and so when he deals with decisive biographical events or outstanding artistic achievements he folds them largely into an everyday context.
In most cases, it seems that an aura of contextuality, circumstantiality and situationality are embedded in our conception and definition of the nature of plurality, (71) a similar feat shared by and that tends to inundate our understanding of the resilient concept of ethnicity in Africa.
Defoe's insights were into the limits rather than the exploitation of a narrative realism that relied on plausible circumstantiality.
At the same time, the revised romance locates its proliferating exemplary narratives within a wide variety of interpretive contexts and frames: narrative and experiential circumstantiality is not erased by its governing method.
In The School for Scandal comic circumstantiality is privileged over abstract morality, as it is in The Rivals and in She Stoops to Conquer.
Drawing on Fielding's proposition that the novel's "new province" is the investigation of "Human Nature," and Laurence Sterne's "radical and total dethroning of 'story'" and focus on seemingly insignificant topics in Tristram Shandy (1759), Kundera claims that "in the art of the novel, existential discoveries are inseparable from the transformation of form." This emphasis on new understandings of the human creature through new representations guides his pithy, illuminating account of the novel's development: from a focus on plot and story, to an emphasis on psychological plausibility and material circumstantiality (from Balzac and Flaubert through Joyce and Proust), to the surrealist-existentialist-metafictional works of such writers as Kafka, Garcia Marquez, and Kundera himself.