cicada killer


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Synonyms for cicada killer

large black or rust-colored wasp that preys on cicadas

References in periodicals archive ?
The relation between prey and sex in the cicada killer.
The weight of cicada killer wasps, Sphecius speciosus, and the weight of their prey.
Differential prey selection for the sex of offspring in the cicada killer Sphecius speciosus (Hymenoptera: Sphecidae).
SIZE CATEGORIES OF DIFFERENT SPECIES OF CICADAS RETRIEVED FROM FEMALE CICADA KILLER WASPS AT NEWBERRY AND ST.
If, as in many other provisioning Hymenoptera, the size of individual offspring in cicada killers is determined largely by the mass of their provision (Punzo 1994; Strohm 2000; Seidelmann 2006), then female cicada killers should generally be much larger than males.
Lin (1979b) presented evidence that female cicada killers hunt cicadas selectively by size, species, and sex.
Female cicada killers usually enter their burrows rapidly when returning with or without paralyzed cicadas and, therefore, we developed a method to detain them briefly to allow identification of wasp and prey.
2008) for cicada killers sampled at these locations.
The influence of size, age, and residency status on territory defense in male western cicada killer wasps (Sphecius grandis, Hymenoptera: Sphecidae).
If, as in many other provisioning wasps, the size of individual offspring in cicada killers is determined largely by provision mass, then females should, on average, be much larger than males.
However, to our knowledge, no previous study of cicada killers, or of any other provisioning wasp, has focused on regional variation in body size of the wasps or on how such variation might be related to variation in size of their prey.
However, unlike many other mass provisioners, cicada killers appear to provide each nest cell with a nearly constant prey number rather than with a relatively constant prey mass.
Why have cicada killers apparently evolved to provision nest cells with fairly consistent number of prey?
If, as we contend, the size of cicada prey determines the size of cicada killers, then the size range of the wasps should parallel the large range that exists in the prey.
This study has determined that variation in body size exists among regional populations of cicada killers, and that wasp size can be predicted from the size of available prey.