Chimera

(redirected from chimaeras)
Also found in: Dictionary, Medical, Encyclopedia.
Graphic Thesaurus  🔍
Display ON
Animation ON
Legend
Synonym
Antonym
Related
  • noun

Synonyms for Chimera

Synonyms for Chimera

a fantastic, impracticable plan or desire

Synonyms for Chimera

(Greek mythology) fire-breathing female monster with a lion's head and a goat's body and a serpent's tail

a grotesque product of the imagination

References in periodicals archive ?
Dr Peter Kyne, senior research fellow at Charles Darwin University and Red List authority for the IUCN SSG, said: "Sharks, rays and chimaeras tend to grow slowly and produce few young [ones], which leaves them particularly vulnerable to overfishing.
GREEK mythology has stories about Chimaera, a monstrous fire- breathing lion, goat and snake hybrid and one has been recently caught off the coast of Newfoundland.
The effects of fishing on sharks, rays, and chimaeras (chondrichthyans), and the implications for marine ecosystems.
Chimaeras and mosaics for dissecting complex mutant phenotypes.
In Reproductive Biology and Phylogeny of Chondrichthyes: Sharks, Batoids and Chimaeras.
According to the findings, sharks, rays and chimaeras are at a substantially higher risk than most other groups of animals and have the lowest percentage of species considered safe with only 23% categorized as Least Concern.
The researchers found that sharks, rays and chimaeras face a substantially higher risk of extinction than do most other animals.
Cartilaginous fishes include sharks, rays, skates and chimaeras.
In his nonfictional family, Hawthorne saw in Julian's childish pastimes--what he describes in "Twenty Days with Julian" as imaginary "warfare" with "hydras, chimaeras, dragons, and Gorgons" (8:445)--the monstrous battles that would be the business of his adult life.
The effects of fishing on sharks, rays, and chimaeras (Chrondrichthyans), and the implications for marine ecosystems.
After Richard Lawrence's failed attempt to assassinate Jackson, the Washington Globe blamed Clay and Calhoun for provoking the assault, describing Lawrence as "infatuated with the chimaeras which have troubled the brains of the disappointed orators who have depicted the President as a Caesar who ought to have a Brutus.
Vladimir Gvozden introduces the reader in the fourth chapter of the volume titled 'Writing Difference/ Claiming General Validity: Jovan Ducic's Cities and Chimaeras and the West'.