References in classic literature ?
But, to return from this digression, care ought to be taken that the bodies of the children may be such as will answer the expectations of the legislator; this also will be affected by the same means.
She saw the children of the settlement on the grassy margin of the street, or at the domestic thresholds, disporting themselves in such grim fashions as the Puritanic nurture would permit
The birds sat on the trees and sang so sweetly that the children used to stop their games in order to listen to them.
There are some of us now reaching middle age who discover themselves to be lamenting the past in one respect if in none other, that there are no books written now for children comparable with those of thirty years ago.
Early next morning the forester got up and went out hunting, and when he was gone the children were still in bed.
Besides, the children of the poor know but few pleasures.
What, Mopo," he said to me, "shall I rear up children to put me to the assegai when they grow great?
You have been such good children that I am going to send you to visit my granny, who lives in a dear little hut in the wood.
The children dwelt in a city, and had no wider play-place than a little garden before the house, divided by a white fence from the street, and with a pear-tree and two or three plum-trees overshadowing it, and some rose-bushes just in front of the parlor-windows.
I granted her that this was true, and a very commendable thing, provided the poor children fell into good hands afterwards, and were not abused, starved, and neglected by the nurses that bred them up.
At that moment, the fresh and joyous cries of children passed in front of the cell.
At first he had wagged his head and wondered how it was that the children understood what I told them so well, and could not learn from him; and he laughed like anything when I replied that neither he nor I could teach them very much, but that THEY might teach us a good deal.
Children sweeten labors; but they make misfortunes more bitter.
Then questions of the more remote future occurred to her: how she was to place her children in the world.
At first, she read to please her humble friend; but soon her own earnest nature threw out its tendrils, and wound itself around the majestic book; and Eva loved it, because it woke in her strange yearnings, and strong, dim emotions, such as impassioned, imaginative children love to feel.
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