cerebration

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Synonyms for cerebration

Synonyms for cerebration

References in periodicals archive ?
To what extent, then, is this ironization--this celebration and cerebration of indeterminacy--consistent with a progressive and dynamic mode of Utopian thought?
Time and again he salutes the cerebrations as "brilliant," the poems as "beautiful" or "haunting." These they intermittently are, I agree, but more often other adjectives come to mind, such as "woolly," "turgid," and "diffuse." "Genius tends to be careless in its strength.
"Father," we say, touching our heads, the seats of our cerebrations, and we think of the Maker, that vast incomprehensible coherence stitching everything together, and
Ultimately, though, Wood sees Nabokov's flashy cerebrations as secondary to his achievement as a "theorist of pain." From his father's assassination to his family's exile from revolutionary Russia, Nabokov was ever the poet of memory and loss--loss gripped in language.
And the recent cerebrations and remembrances have led my mind back to the trip to Eastern Europe I took some months ago with my father, climaxing with a visit to Hungary, to Budapest, to the very building in which he was born.
The cerebrations that came in the wake of Algeria's presidential elections were in the traditional style.
Those cerebrations of womanhood so extolled in Odyssey with the Goddess here become instruments of torture for Sonoma, mortified at her mother's public announcement of the teenager's first period.
And he said he would rather any day go and hear Champagne Charlie or Hi-tiddley-hi-ti, or They're all very fine and large, than the sloppy sentiment of Tosti's Good-bye, or the fustian of Stephen Adams's Mid-shipmite, or any other cerebrations of the Victorian drawing-room composers.
We still think in terms of a story "changing" the reader's emotions, cerebrations, maybe even her life.
This novel, designed as an antidote to the cloying Columbian quincentenary celebrations and cerebrations, is a brilliant appropriation of the master symbol of Euroamerican history.
In the first place, he was both a professional musician and a creditable literary scholar and was able to give to his essays in criticism an authenticity that Poe's more fanciful cerebrations might never have achieved on their own.