censor

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Synonyms for censor

Synonyms for censor

to examine (material) and remove parts considered harmful or improper for publication or transmission

to keep from being published or transmitted

Synonyms for censor

someone who censures or condemns

a person who is authorized to read publications or correspondence or to watch theatrical performances and suppress in whole or in part anything considered obscene or politically unacceptable

Related Words

forbid the public distribution of ( a movie or a newspaper)

subject to political, religious, or moral censorship

References in periodicals archive ?
By the 2000s, gay and lesbian sexual representations had crossed those borders, and their non-heterosexuality alone was no longer sufficient to cast them as non-normative and censorable.
Apple, on the other hand, has been able to avoid such conflicts, until the App Store introduced censorable content in the form of applications.
Because the magazine is highly censorable, I would suggest that you send me copies by first class air mail--perhaps in two or three installments, at intervals of a few days apart.
30) SRC reviewers initially believed that the fantastic plots of horror films, coming from the work of internationally famous authors, would defuse the possibility that Dracula, Frankenstein, Murders in the Rue Morgue, and subsequent horror films of the 1930s could be viewed as realistic and censorable.
It is this laborious and intentional absence of anything remotely censorable that makes the production so powerful.
Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and you run the risk of the response being highly censorable.
But this system and the discourse that it generates comprise part of the sociolect known by both writer and reader: certain words, phrases, and situations are censorable by virtue of their sordid, blasphemous, or obscene character.
Cause-effect links between literature and the monarchy are tenuous but just as Baudelaire in the following century found prose poetry an apt medium for presenting some censorable ideas, so did Fenelon and Montesquieu weave into their works social commentary.