causative

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Antonyms for causative

producing an effect

References in periodicals archive ?
57) Under this criterion, the witness's testimony that the errant cab was green was credible enough to rule out the "errant blue cab" scenario as causatively implausible.
The experiments show that the bacterium "may causatively contribute to the development of obesity" in humans, according to the study.
Summers and Cook both involved a claimant who had been negligently shot by a hunter but, because another negligent hunter had fired at the same time as the causative shot, it was impossible to determine which hunter had causatively wronged the claimant: both concerned the indeterminate wrongdoer situation.
Although this data is suggestive of a temporal relationship between exposure to anesthetic agents and learning disability, it cannot causatively implicate any specific anesthetic agent or technique due to multiple confounding factors.
Schillebeeckx rightly refuses to say that God in any way "uses" evil or innocent suffering toward some greater purpose, as though God were somehow causatively involved in what diminishes creation.
Therefore, there must be an infinite being that is causatively responsible for his being and this being is God.
32) Another virus, HTLV-1, is causatively associated with adult T-cell leukemia, and daily consumption of a green tea extract significantly reduced the number of viral particles in infected people.
On the basis of results of animal studies and limited preliminary human studies, catalytic iron has been causatively linked to kidney disease (11, 12) and CVD (13-15).
Unintended consequences result when public policies reshape any single component of the continuum of social experiences that are causatively related to language development.
Douglas West argues in favour of the privatization initiative and claims that there is little evidence to support the assertion that increased availability can be causatively related to increased social and health-related problems.
29) Human errors falling into the first three categories are more likely to be less morally blameworthy and causatively influenced by systemic factors, especially in complex environments such as healthcare.