cattail


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References in periodicals archive ?
"If the cattails were gone, we'd have no problems with water clarity on Lake Okeechobee.
At 3:30 p.m., Kyle was back at the cattail slough where he'd earlier watched the buck and doe bed down.
When Blitz got that hunk of cattail up his nose, I knew whatever gripped it during the removal process had to be strong.
The cattail plant is so good at spreading itself that it is often the first new growth in wet mud.
The place was a North Dakota farm pond, a quarter mile long, 100 yards wide, and surrounded by a band of tall cattails where at least three rooster pheasants had landed after flushing from a nearby field of corn stubble.
Cover types included sedge (Cyperaceae), rush (Juncaceae), forb, reed, other grasses (Poaceae), broadleaf cattail (Typha latifolia), woody plants (identified to species), litter (leaves and woody debris), bare ground, and rock.
A replacement was cast by Emmanuel King at Cattail Foundry, Gordonville, Pennsylvania, using the original Frick wood pattern.
Known as cattail plaiting, the ancient technique comes from Hubin, a small countryside town north of Beijing and is a way for women of the community to bond, as well as be financially independent and socially bonded.
Brandt Lake contains areas of sago pondweed, cattails, and bulrushes, while cattail marshes occur along portions of Round Lake.
Edith Mills, whose ethereal spirit is sometimes seen floating across the Cattail Valley farm she once owned and we now call home.
In the cattail marshes of the delta lived the Yuma clapper rail (Rallus longirostris yumanensis), a chicken-sized bird for which the security of the cattails provided places to rest, hunt, and raise their young.
Master artists and apprentices will be integrated into the programs to pass on their skills and knowledge, with an emphasis on disappearing art forms such as bow making, cattail weaving and woodland pottery.
The name cattail comes from the distinctive, thick brown cluster of female flowers that are borne on a spike near the top of the plant, giving it the appearance of a cat's tail.