castrate

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Synonyms for castrate

Synonyms for castrate

to render incapable of reproducing sexually

Synonyms for castrate

a man who has been castrated and is incapable of reproduction

Synonyms

Related Words

deprive of strength or vigor

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edit by omitting or modifying parts considered indelicate

References in periodicals archive ?
All of them were castrated with burdizzo's castrator in closed method at Veterinary dispensaries, one week to a few months previous to presentation.
Castrators may use advantage by the reduction of host reproductive efforts by the sense of increased host survivorship (Shawal et al., 2008; Caladona et al., 2005; Wecker, 1962); increased host growth (Calado et al., 2005; Cheng, 1971) and increased energy availability (Hughes, 1940).
In setting out her theoretical framework, the author covers a great deal of ground lightly--theories of tragedy, Freud's many theoretical writings relating to fear and to women as castrated/ castrators, other psychoanalytic theories, diverse feminist theories--and is able to show how dramatizations of Judith act as a 'container' not just for fear of what woman represents but for fear or dread generally.
She finds that Gothic versions of this figure shift from relatively benign if eternally damned (according to legend, Ahasuerus was cursed for mocking Christ on his way to Calvary), to associations with increasingly vitriolic stereotypes of Jews as, for instance, animalistic, diseased, incestuous, occultist, parasitical, and usurious anti-citizens, body snatchers, castrators, conspirators, deicides, homosexuals, and infanticides.
Against charges of being castrators, child abusers or vain delusionaries, these women, these wives and mothers, along with dozens of others, have persisted--while also carrying the burden of all artists in a country where there is only room at the top for the few survivors.
During the final scene Clem receives this dubious promotion offstage but reappears straight afterwards to lambaste his castrators: "No more of your honor, if you love me!" he exclaims.
The Rosicrucians, the Tongs of Terror, the Cult of the Black Mother, The Secret Rites of Mitra, and the Castrators of Russia are cases in point (Daural, 1961/1989).
By cutting off reproduction without usually killing their hosts (and therefore allowing them to continue consuming resources), parasitic castrators reduce the average [varepsilon] in a population.
Perhaps this explains why the author identifies religious dissidence with the skoptsy castrators and khlysty (flagellants), who had little to do with the changing religious attitudes of the majority of the population (p.
The valorization of dominant cultural norms for women's talk seems to underlie black men's portrayal of black women as domineering speakers, for example as "verbal castrators" (Abrahams, 1975; Bond & Peery, 1970; Rogers-Rose, 1980; Spillers, 1979), or as contentious "hard mouths" (Folb, 1980).
Participants in the African Women's Leadership Institute made a list of terms used to describe feminists in their societies: "Lesbians, Power hungry, Emotionally deprived, Sexually frustrated, 'Beijing women,' Sexually promiscuous, Unmarriageable, Against God's plan, Castrators, Westernized, Witches, Women who want to have testicles, Elite." US feminists, who have been targeted by conservatives for the last two decades, have added another term: femiNazis.
She provides a sweeping review of the image of black women as castrators and white women as saviors of black men in Wright's published canon to 1982, giving credit to Wright's "deft and moving renderings of a black woman's experience" in "Bright and Morning Star." Citing the mute characterization of Lulu Mann in "Down by the Riverside," Williams casts her as Wright's prototypical speechless or invisible black woman whom Wright blames as the handicap to his black male heroes.
The construction of woman as monstrous is related to male psychosexual anxieties and textualized through patriarchal representations of women as abject or as castrators. It is this second figure--woman as castrator--that appears relevant for an analysis of Basic Instinct.