castration anxiety


Also found in: Dictionary, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to castration anxiety: castration complex, Electra complex
Graphic Thesaurus  🔍
Display ON
Animation ON
Legend
Synonym
Antonym
Related
  • noun

Words related to castration anxiety

(psychoanalysis) anxiety resulting from real or imagined threats to your sexual functions

References in periodicals archive ?
She could understand castration anxiety in guilty adults, she said.
So, although Freud's concept of castration anxiety indicates an object to be lost, it turns out that later Freud associates anxiety with an indefinite, unknown object; and Lacan's view likewise shifts from the assumption of an object of anxiety to that "object" being the amorphous das Ding.
He, on the other hand, seems plagued by delay, avoidance, castration anxiety, and doubt, and perhaps could have been read also in relation to Lacan's interpretation of Hamlet, the story of another well-known procrastinator.
He gives the monocle the status of a fetish object covering castration anxiety, given its emblematic role as the presence of the male, its position over the womb of the model, its emptiness, and its position over the pink peignoir, the article of clothing that thwarts the nudity that Victorine as Olympia so brazenly displayed in the Salon of 1865.
In his theory of castration anxiety, according to Boyarin, Freud exhibits the "doubled consciousness" of the colonized, that is, the simultaneous self-contempt in the gaze of, and desire for, the dominant culture.
In the former, readers will find insightful commentaries on themes such as mob mentality, consumer society and its concomitant "hostility toward inanimate objects" (89), "subversion voyeurism" (90), and castration anxiety.
The narrator's fears closely resemble castration anxiety as defined by Freud in the twentieth century.
It replaces the "missing" imaginary female penis with a symbolic phallus, thereby warding off castration anxiety and disavowing the anatomical distinction between the sexes by paradoxically erecting a hypercathected monument to both.
In The Sound and the Fury, Quentin Compson is beset by repressed feelings of inadequacy and suffers from castration anxiety, represented in the text as a preoccupation with phallic: symbols (knives, smokestacks, clock towers).
The fetish, writes Eby, "replaces the `missing' imaginary female penis with a symbolic phallus, thereby warding off castration anxiety and disavowing the anatomical distinction between the sexes by paradoxically erecting a hypercathected monument to both" (73).
some portion of her arrogance is, in turn, a consequence of her own compensatory anxiety that she lacks the phallus, then the androgyne is the sight/site of the mutual interplay between narcissism and castration anxiety for both male and female" (172).
He concludes that collecting (most common in children before puberty and again in men in their 40s) is a compensation mechanism against crisis or failure in personal relationships, and ultimately against castration anxiety.
We can hardly speak with propriety of castration anxiety where castration has already taken place" (1926, 123).
Finally, one might feminize the very structure of the fetishizing process, which traditionally assumes castration anxiety and female inferiority.