carpenter

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Synonyms for carpenter

joiner

Synonyms

Words related to carpenter

a woodworker who makes or repairs wooden objects

work as a carpenter

Related Words

References in classic literature ?
This young Matthew Maule, the carpenter, it must be observed, was a person little understood, and not very generally liked, in the town where he resided; not that anything could be alleged against his integrity, or his skill and diligence in the handicraft which he exercised.
Pyncheon's message, the carpenter merely tarried to finish a small job, which he happened to have in hand, and then took his way towards the House of the Seven Gables.
There was a vertical sundial on the front gable; and as the carpenter passed beneath it, he looked up and noted the hour.
But the carpenter had a great deal of pride and stiffness in his nature; and, at this moment, moreover, his heart was bitter with the sense of hereditary wrong, because he considered the great Pyncheon House to be standing on soil which should have been his own.
Black Scipio answered the summons in a prodigious, hurry; but showed the whites of his eyes in amazement on beholding only the carpenter.
said Miss Carpenter slowly, as if this reason had not occurred to her before.
Miss Carpenter again gave her tears way, and could not reply.
She said it was all your fault," sobbed Miss Carpenter.
I b-believe you LIKE writing in the Recording Angel," said Miss Carpenter spitefully.
He ate more than the Carpenter, though,' said Tweedledee.
You see he held his handkerchief in front, so that the Carpenter couldn't count how many he took: contrariwise.
Then I like the Carpenter best--if he didn't eat so many as the Walrus.
The carpenter had once been a prisoner in Andersonville prison and had lost a brother.
Concerning the old carpenter who fixed the bed for the writer, I only mentioned him because he, like many of what are called very common people, became the nearest thing to what is understandable and lovable of all the grotesques in the writer's book.
I do not know how this really happened, yet the fact remains that one fine day this piece of wood found itself in the shop of an old carpenter.