caprice

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  • noun

Synonyms for caprice

Synonyms for caprice

an impulsive, often illogical turn of mind

Synonyms for caprice

a sudden desire

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References in classic literature ?
In the matter of wills, personal qualities were subordinate to the great fundamental fact of blood; and to be determined in the distribution of your property by caprice, and not make your legacies bear a direct ratio to degrees of kinship, was a prospective disgrace that would have embittered her life.
As to any other kind of discipline, whether addressed to her mind or heart, little Pearl might or might not be within its reach, in accordance with the caprice that ruled the moment.
These outbreaks of a fierce temper had a kind of value, and even comfort for the mother; because there was at least an intelligible earnestness in the mood, instead of the fitful caprice that so often thwarted her in the child's manifestations.
But who can say what experiments may be produced by the caprice of particular States, by the ambition of enterprising leaders, or by the intrigues and influence of foreign powers?
To have required the unanimous ratification of the thirteen States, would have subjected the essential interests of the whole to the caprice or corruption of a single member.
The Lady Henrietta followed the usual progress of pretty women, particularly coquettish women; she passed from caprice to contradiction; -- the gallant had undergone the caprice, the courtier must bend beneath the contradictory humor.
THE cruiser Vanator careened through the tempest That she had not been dashed to the ground, or twisted by the force of the elements into tangled wreckage, was due entirely to the caprice of Nature.
If she still hesitates, and if I still hesitate, you must attribute our strange conduct, if you like, to caprice in both cases, and we must bear the imputation as well as we can.
Weston's nature to imagine that any caprice could be strong enough to affect one so dear, and, as he believed, so deservedly dear.