canonical

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  • adj

Synonyms for canonical

Synonyms for canonical

adhering to beliefs or practices approved by authority or tradition

Synonyms for canonical

appearing in a biblical canon

Synonyms

of or relating to or required by canon law

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reduced to the simplest and most significant form possible without loss of generality

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conforming to orthodox or recognized rules

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References in periodicals archive ?
That being said, her single translation (written in the context of a brief and unfavourable discussion of the poet) did little to promote the poet to English audiences and as such cannot be credited with triggering a canonicity and a readership for Villon in England.
The philosophically endorsed claim to universality of the idea of the canon notwithstanding, canonicity, from its beginning, was tied to the practical vagaries of reception, conservation, and transmission of texts and artefacts.
Hoffman, "Inspiration, Normativeness, Canonicity, and the Unique Sacred Character of the Bible," Catholic Biblical Quarterly 44 (1982) 447-69; Robert Gnuse, The Authority of the Bible: Theories of Inspiration, Revelation, and the Canon of Scripture (New York:
Neavill investigates issues of canonicity in relation to reprint publishing and copyright in the eighteenth century and Simon Eliot describes the early years of the Clarendon Press Series and the transition from learned printers to modern publishers in chapter 4.
The examples provided also agree on the need to formulate different degrees of predictability based on a work's canonicity (a canonical work will in principle generate more dialogues) and aesthetic value (the more the aesthetic qualities of a work, the more the chances of belonging to the canon of great books), on readers' reaction in reception (scandals will tend to generate more echoes), on forms of echo-dialogues (such as the number of copies, editions and sequels of a work, the number of literary prizes received).
However, such is the burden of canonicity from which Irish children's literature suffers that the genre is unable to assimilate itself as neatly into a hierarchy of subject positions with that same ease which Stephen Dedalus rendered himself on the flyleaf of a geography schoolbook:
In the final chapter, Franta's treatment of Charlotte Smith, Felicia Hemans, and Alfred Tennyson begins to address issues of gender and canonicity implicit throughout the book.
Adam Smith's Discourse: Canonicity, Commerce, and Conscience.
That is, Bloom's exiguous Catalan canon, plainly determined by the availability of English translations at the time of writing, has the status of guesswork insofar as canonical certainty relies on the test of time and the precarious canonicity of 20th-century works.
In Valentine's words, one can almost discern the seeds of one-hundred years' worth of healthy, spirited, and rigorous debate about pedagogy, theory, and canonicity.
This section ensued logically from the ecological arc described by Fender in his introduction, where he emphasizes not Walden's canonicity in the present but rather the author's marginal status and ecological foresight in his own day.
These, assessed on any objective scale of merit, would have no claim to canonicity.
Though space prevents me from articulating in depth these norms' raisons d'etre, I will expound upon some of their attributes in the pages that follow, as a route to explicating their noteworthy sway on canonicity.
But such a view is unsustainable: a great deal of evidence makes clear that the Bible is the product of extremely complex processes of oral and written transmission ex-tending over centuries, about which the early church councils made decisions concerning canonicity from among a much wider range of early Christian literature, including the apocryphal gospels.
Collection development strategies must take this into account and librarians must negotiate the complex dilemmas and problems of canonicity and canon-formation from an informed standpoint, realizing that each decision they make has and will have a significant effect on the development of the culture, not only within the academic institution in which they work but on the larger society as a whole.