uterine cervix

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Synonyms for uterine cervix

necklike opening to the uterus

References in periodicals archive ?
However, many physicians are not adhering to cancer screening guidelines backed by good evidence.[1,2] Also, many are performing cancer screening procedures that are not recommended (either because of a lack of evidence or because they have been shown to be ineffective).[3]
Carter and co-authors (2013) noted that as medical knowledge evolves, so do prostate cancer screening guidelines. Orom and colleagues (2015) also acknowledged the controversy about the guidelines for prostate cancer screening caused patients to have decreased trust in health information.
Because women of minority races/ethnicities have an earlier age of onset of breast cancer (45 to 50 years) compared with white women (60 to 65 years), current USPSTF breast cancer screening guidelines to begin biennial mammography screening at age 50 may disproportionately miss the opportunity for diagnosis in these groups.
'A referral system and cancer screening guidelines will be adopted for the state while cancer directories will be compiled and circulated to all relevant stakeholders.
According to the company, it plans to seek approval in future submissions for reporting of HPV types beyond 16, 18 and 45 consistent with the extended genotyping capabilities of the assay's design and aligned with evolving cervical cancer screening guidelines.
"As breast cancer screening guidelines change from age-based to risk-based, it is important to know how standard risk factors impact breast cancer risk for women of different ages," said Karla Kerlikowske, MD, senior author of the new study and a member of the University of California San Francisco Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Centre.
BD intends to seek approval in future submissions for reporting of HPV types beyond 16, 18 and 45 consistent with the extended genotyping capabilities of the assay's design and aligned with evolving cervical cancer screening guidelines.
While there are some shortcomings associated with co-testing, if clinical research and real-world evidence suggest that co-testing works, it is hard to understand why the USPSTF would choose to eliminate it from cervical cancer screening guidelines.
Trends in the percentage of Title X clients screened for cervical cancer were examined in relation to changes in cervical cancer screening guidelines, particularly the 2009 American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) update that raised the age for starting cervical cancer screening to 21 years (5) and the 2012 alignment of screening guidelines from ACOG, the U.S.
Current cervical cancer screening guidelines do not differentiate between women who have been vaccinated and those who have not, but this should be reevaluated in light of the study findings, the researchers noted.
"In fact, we're pleased that in early August, the National Comprehensive Cancer Network included tomosynthesis for the first time in its recommended breast cancer screening guidelines," Valenti says.
Howard and Adams (2012) examined the effect of the 2009 USPSTF change in breast cancer screening guidelines on receipt of mammography.
Many subspecialty organizations and government agencies publish cervical cancer screening guidelines. The USPSTF guidelines, reviewed here, are evidence based, frequently updated, and widely used by primary care providers (table).
To add to clinicians' uncertainty, the 2013 American Urologic Association's (AUA) prostate cancer screening guidelines offered a Grade B recommendation of screening only in men aged 55 to 69 years, after shared decision-making with a clinician.
(1) But CIN did not develop more often in HIV-positive women when researchers looked only at women with a normal initial Pap test who followed cervical cancer screening guidelines. And invasive cervical cancer did not arise in HIV-positive women more than in HIV-negative women.
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