sedative

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Synonyms for sedative

Synonyms for sedative

Synonyms for sedative

References in periodicals archive ?
Faced with tens of militants who threatened to kill hundreds of Muscovites, Russian authorities pumped a calmative into the ventilation system rather than storm the theater.
So calmative yoga exercises didn't have a significant decrease in intestinal-abdominal obesity.
in truth / I might have half believed that I had pass'd / A houseless being in a human shape, / An enemy of nature, one who comes / From regions far beyond the Indian hills." The rest of the poem, and its subsequent transformations, can appear as intended to offer a cautionary lesson and calmative solution to this discombobulating agitation and excitement.
developing pharmacological "calmatives" that could incapacitate combatants.
Tristan Roberts, 28, inadvertently overdosed on the lethal brew which he may have taken as a late-night calmative.
The drugs often do not directly medicate the problem but act as a calmative. Part of the condition is psychological, and the other part is organic.
Alongside common cooking herbs like rosemary, thyme, sage and mint are the lesser-known borage, wormwood (from which absinthe is made), rue (an antispasmodic and calmative that can also induce abortions, according to Messerli) and St.
One of the company's newest offerings is Tranquil Day calming formula caplets, a daytime calmative that diminishes nervousness, irritability and tension without drowsiness.
And only thus can philosophy avoid becoming--by yielding to the allure of ease--a simple and already usual "metaphysical calmative", through which man takes refuge in a "soothing" world (beruhigende Welt).
sedative: Substance that reduces nervous tension; usually stronger than a calmative.
Besides Shearer's book, examples of calmative tales include Oughton (1996) and Desimini's (illustrator) How the Stars Fell Into the Sky: A Navajo Legend.
Formulated to be a calmative solution to restlessness, the product addresses the causes that inhibit a child from sleeping well, including night terrors, growing pains, and sleeplessness from vacation travel, while promising that the child won't wake up groggy like they might if given over-the-counter drugs containing diphenhy-dramine (such as Benadryl)--a significant concern for school-age children who need to be alert first thing in the morning.
The only solace lies in a collective mother-daughter subjectivity mediated by the hypnotic calmative of the chant.