calendrical

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Synonyms for calendrical

relating to or characteristic of or used in a calendar or time measurement

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References in periodicals archive ?
As he puts it, "The idea of a sociological organism moving calendrically through homogeneous, empty time is a precise analogue of the idea of the nation, which also is conceived as a solid community moving steadily down (or up) history" (26).
While the fact of the switch is true, it can only signal, pace McColley, that the text as we have it is calendrically inconsistent: why would Domingo ever employ the Julian calendar?
The real nation is simply a present tense imagining as opposed to the fictional nation which conjures an existence in the past and future: The idea of a sociological organism moving calendrically through homogeneous, empty time is a precise analogue of the idea of the nation, which is also conceived as a solid community moving steadily down (or up) history.
Years separated by 6 years are calendrically identical if the intervening period includes a single leap year.
One assessed knowledge of the 28-year rule, with five pairs of years differing by 28 or 56 years, e.g., 1992 and 1964, and the other five pairs being calendrically dissimilar years separated by an even number of years, e.g., 1991 and 1977.
It may be worth noticing that Melanie's arrival in Paris is as confused calendrically as it is horologically: though Le Soleil suggests that she arrives on 24 July, by the end of her short taxi ride to rue Germaine Pilon, she emerges into 'uncertain August daylight' (p.
For Anderson, the realist representation of an imagined world "moving calendrically through homogeneous, empty time is a precise analogue of the idea of the nation, which also is conceived as a solid community moving steadily down (or up) history" (26).
The transcriptions are presented calendrically, "combining office and Mass chants into a single series" (p.
in the sense that characters do not move "calendrically through
As Benedict Anderson explains "The idea of a sociological organism moving calendrically through homogenous, empty time is a precise analogue of the idea of the nation, which is conceived as a solid community moving steadily down (or up) history" (26).
In this way, even though the Sun and Moon raced along at different clips, they periodically wound up in the same chariot in a marriage of celestial cycles that kept the seasons calendrically on course.
9 October 1342, as opposed to the calendrically macaronic "ultimos de Agosto" of 443 AH in Ericeira.
In terms of the preference for March over April, Depuydt states that the crucifixion's having occurred in March is the consensus of the early sources, although calendrically he is willing to entertain the possibility of an April crucifixion.
KRUPP is calendrically informed but chronically late at Griffith Observatory in Los Angeles.