cache

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Synonyms for cache

Synonyms for cache

to put or keep out of sight

Synonyms for cache

a hidden storage space (for money or provisions or weapons)

Related Words

a secret store of valuables or money

Synonyms

Related Words

(computer science) RAM memory that is set aside as a specialized buffer storage that is continually updated

save up as for future use

References in periodicals archive ?
However, prefix caching has a drawback that not every prefix is cacheable.
When combined with MobiTV's DRM solution, personal copies are secured, fully cacheable and support scalable and efficient delivery.
In addition to cacheable Web content, Akamai's intelligent Platform can offload delivery of protected content, resource-intensive SSL content, and many types of dynamic content - including entire applications, for example, through Akamai's EdgeComputing capabilities.
They moved in large schools during high tide and this behavior tends to make the species easy cacheable near the mangrove ecosystem perhaps due to the availability of nutrients around the area.
The company said that its invention provides a cacheable, cross-platform standard compatible with all web servers and browsers, saving up to 90% on bandwidth costs, while ensuring an almost 100% playback rate without any effort from the consumer.
For example, both species spent less time foraging, though more time foraging cacheable diets and feeding in their insulated nest boxes.
Steganographers have complete control over the clientside library, which of course is necessary so that object-oriented languages can be made signed, trainable, and cacheable.
Content that is cacheable goes onto the Akamai network and is distributed on additional servers on the network as usage increases," Sanchez explains.
With this Content Delivery Manager, customers will experience huge increases in the cacheable delivery of their application content, resulting in radically higher performance benefits as compared to standard static or network cache server approaches.
One of the main limitations of the early solutions is that they were designed primarily for use on the Internet and, as a result, they focused on reducing the amount of cacheable, static Web HTTP traffic flowing across WANs.