Sexton

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Related to burying beetle: sexton beetle
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Synonyms for Sexton

United States poet (1928-1974)

Synonyms

an officer of the church who is in charge of sacred objects

References in periodicals archive ?
Competition with flies promotes communal breeding in the burying beetle, Nicrophorus tomentosus.
Caption: Mood killer while tending larvae, a mother burying beetle produces increased amounts of methyl geranate (red line), which reduces a father's urge to mate.
Carrion is what the American Burying Beetle uses to feed and multiply.
This type of mitigation solution was one of the first of its kind to address the American burying beetle.
The burying beetle was created for a purpose and it acts according to and is true to that purpose.
Population estimate of the endangered American burying beetle, Nicrophorus americanus Olivier (Coleoptera: Silphidae) in South Dakota.
In 1989, the Fish and Wildlife Service listed the American burying beetle as endangered.
In 2005 she published her debut novel, The Burying Beetle, in which she introduced the character of Gussie.
Weyerhaeuser takes special measures to protect rare, threatened or endangered species such as the Red Hills salamander in Alabama, the gopher tortoise in Louisiana and Mississippi, the American burying beetle in Arkansas and Oklahoma, and the northern spotted owl in Oregon and Washington.
Arkansas, Oklahoma; 40,000 acres; American burying beetle.
The technical quality of the portraiture is so fine, the composition so pleasing, that we gladly contemplate for a few moments creatures as strange as the Furbish lousewort (yes, at last we have a look at the plant with the fabled name) and the American burying beetle.
Fish and Wildlife Service to sign off on the company's mitigation plan for the American burying beetle, a regulatory criteria he said TransCanada has met.
OSU, Forest Service, and Fish and Wildlife Service biologists carefully unearthed a subset of the burials and examined them for the presence of American burying beetle larvae.
Several of these listed species, the razorback sucker and American burying beetle, are featured in this edition of the Endangered Species Bulletin.
On a warm July night, a 1 1/4-inch, orange and shiny black AMERICAN BURYING BEETLE (Nicrophorus americanus) "smells", using his antennae, a mouse that has just died.