burrow

(redirected from burrowing)
Also found in: Dictionary, Medical, Encyclopedia.
Graphic Thesaurus  🔍
Display ON
Animation ON
Legend
Synonym
Antonym
Related
  • all
  • noun
  • verb

Synonyms for burrow

Synonyms for burrow

a place used as an animal's dwelling

Synonyms

Synonyms for burrow

a hole made by an animal, usually for shelter

move through by or as by digging

Synonyms

References in periodicals archive ?
In Kansas, burrowing owls are uncommon summer residents in western shortgrass and mixed-grass prairies where prairie dogs have not been extirpated (west of the 100[degrees] meridian; Busby and Zimmerman, 2001; Klute et al., 2003), and it appears they have never been common in eastern tallgrass prairies (Sheffield, 1997; Klute et al., 2003).
It was a severely declining western burrowing owl population that suffered.
Several studies have focused on the direct importance of grain size on the burrowing behavior of bivalve habitat generalists, which live in a broad spectrum of morphodynamic beaches (Alexander et al.
In particular, the frequency of burrowing in the frogs N.
To simplify this problem, we chose to compare morphologies and burrowing behaviors of species within one family in which the phylogenetic relationships are well understood and that live in different habitats.
Once a common species in California and across North America, the Western burrowing owl has become a rarer and rarer sight over the last three decades given habitat loss and other environmental perils the bird faces.
The Black-tailed Prairie Dog: social life of a burrowing mammal.
A review of burrowing by semi-fossorial vertebrates in arid environments.
Burrowing would have given small dinosaurs a refuge for the winter where they could rest and conserve energy, but evidence of this had been lacking.
Under natural conditions in sandy Florida soils, extensive measurements of prevailing gases in ~16 cm deep burrows occupied by a closely related burrowing wolf spider, G.
The Camp Shelby burrowing crayfish, Fallicambarus gordoni (Fitzpatrick, 1987), is a primary burrowing crayfish and a candidate species for protection under the United States Endangered Species Act.
This study investigates the mechanics of burrowing in coral cobras (Aspidelaps lubricus).
Burrowing could have helped dinosaurs live in extreme conditions like deserts and polar regions and up in mountains
However, no dose of bifenthrin or exposure to true estrogen deterred this species from burrowing.