burlesque

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Synonyms for burlesque

Synonyms for burlesque

a false, derisive, or impudent imitation of something

to copy (the manner or expression of another), especially in an exaggerated or mocking way

Synonyms for burlesque

a theatrical entertainment of broad and earthy humor

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a composition that imitates or misrepresents somebody's style, usually in a humorous way

make a parody of

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References in periodicals archive ?
Not Shakespeare: Bardolatry and Burlesque in the Nineteenth Century.
Schoch's study of "self-conscious comic critiques" (22) of Shakespeare is divided into four chapters, with a substantial introduction entitled "New Readings for Unconventional Tragedians." He begins by providing a background for what he calls the "burlesque backlash," the "comic attack upon the pious pretensions of 'legitimate' Shakespearean culture" (3).
Burlesque was closely tied to the legitimate theatre, and relied on a "new generation of tragedians" including Henry Irving, Wilson Barrett, and Tommaso Salvini, who created memorable stage productions that were easily ridiculed.
The first chapter, "'Vile beyond endurance': the Language of Burlesque" analyzes the linguistic conventions of these plays, focusing on puns, topical and local allusions, and colloquial and contemporary language.
Moreover, closer study of Bronzino's poetry contributes greatly to our understanding of an artist who has remained, as Ronald Firbank observes, largely "unglimpseable."(5) While Bronzino wrote both lyric and burlesque poems, this study will focus on the painter's burlesque compositions.
Each member of this edectic group, whose intellectual and cultural interests span a wide range of disciplines and professions, engaged in one of the most popular pursuits of the time - the composition of burlesque and lyric poetry.
A small selection of the artist's lyric and burlesque poems were published in sixteenth-century anthologies of poetry.
The purist cannot but look down on parody and burlesque. It can expose pretension but rarely is it more than ephemeral and there is always a danger that it may, as the charming dedication to Manfred Draudt's edition suggests, distort the way a more serious work is perceived.
burlesque French, from the adjective burlesquemocking, burlesque in style, from Italian burlesco, a derivative of burla joke, harmless prank
Burlesque is closely related to parody, although burlesque is generally broader and coarser.
The long history of burlesque includes such early examples in Greece as Batrachomyomachia (The Battle of the Frogs and Mice), an anonymous burlesque of Homer, and the comedies of Aristophanes (5th-4th century BC).
The organisers are Blue Lily Burlesque, who held a similar performance in Coventry last year, starring Britain's Got Talent contestant Talulah Blue.
Soubize is currently teaching burlesque - an exotic form of dance and striptease popular from the 1920s through to the 1950s - at the Dance Workshop in Moseley.
'I've always been fascinated by burlesque,' says the 27 year-old.
'Burlesque is an erotic art form whichhas its sleazy aspects,' she says.