syringe

(redirected from bulb syringe)
Also found in: Dictionary, Medical, Encyclopedia.
Graphic Thesaurus  🔍
Display ON
Animation ON
Legend
Synonym
Antonym
Related
  • all
  • noun
  • verb

Words related to syringe

a medical instrument used to inject or withdraw fluids

spray or irrigate (a body part) with a syringe

Related Words

References in periodicals archive ?
Red rubber bulb syringe is the preferred delivery device in many hospitals all over the world.
Only bulb syringes are allowed in racecourse stable yards, but Twomey told the Ballinrobe stewards he was unaware of the rules regarding syringes.
Neonates were randomly assigned to receive either oronasopharyngeal suctioning with a bulb syringe or wiping of the face and mouth with a towel, starting immediately after the umbilical cord was cut and lasting as long as needed while in the delivery room.
The treatments parents used included recommended treatments such as nasal saline (89%), humidifier (92%), and bulb syringe (92%).
To avoid injuring blood vessels, don't place the bulb syringe or spray bottle very far into the nose.
The anastomosis is tested by gently injecting air and/or methylene blue through the rectum (with an Asepto, or large bulb syringe) while the surgeon occludes the proximal sigmoid with an atraumatic instrument.
He or she may recommend over-the-counter drops to soften the wax before using a bulb syringe to gently flush it out of your ear.
Chapters cover how to build and maintain a warming box, how to properly use a bulb syringe on newborn puppies, umbilical cord care, why puppies must ingest colostrum (an immunity boosting substance produced by the mother) or a suitable substitute early on, how to treat a sick newborn pup if veterinary care is not immediately available, remedying a puppy that becomes chilled or dehydrated, and much more.
This can usually be cleaned out successfully using a bulb syringe and a warm mixture of water and hydrogen peroxide.
Babies can't blow their nose, so inserting a few drops of (unmedicated) saline nose drops into one nostril at a time and gently suctioning the nostril with an infant bulb syringe can help.
Primary care physicians often believe that rinsing the ear canal with a bulb syringe is an effective technique, but this can be a dangerous and painful procedure.
Have patients or parents dean the anus carefully after each stool by wiping gently with moist wipes or, for small infants, using a bulb syringe for irrigation.