buffoon

(redirected from buffoons)
Also found in: Dictionary.
Graphic Thesaurus  🔍
Display ON
Animation ON
Legend
Synonym
Antonym
Related
  • noun

Synonyms for buffoon

clown

Synonyms

Synonyms for buffoon

a rude or vulgar fool

a person who amuses others by ridiculous behavior

References in periodicals archive ?
A "loose cannon", "buffoon" and "interesting" were just some of the ways residents in the city described the 55-year-old who yesterday became the country's 24th PM.
WHY is Birmingham blessed with such idiots and buffoons as MP Jess Phillips and Lord Mayor elect, Muhammad Afzal?
The palaces of Westminster have always been the sanctuary of buffoons and I would have little difficulty in naming a growing list of politicians who would qualify for such an adjective.
Alabama = Avid, livid, animated buffoons attacking modern art
Now do it properly or we will remove your funding!" Fortunately British hopes of success at Wimbledon this year remain intact as Andy Murray is Scottish and has been genetically programmed over many generations to ignore upper class English buffoons.
Bonneville's Head of Deliverance Ian Fletcher ponders the results of a study which suggests making the diving pool shallower, all the while continuing his unenviable struggle to stay afloat in a sea of buffoons.
Jones labelled his critics as 'buffoons and fools' who 'didn't have a clue.' He said: "Some of the fools who are writing and everything else, they haven't got a clue.
Researchers said counsellors were often portrayed as buffoons such as bumbling Frasier Crane and patients don't want to be identified with a mobster like Tony Soprano.
Ferdy Murphy is correct - racing is run by a bunch of buffoons.
The annual city council budget meeting descended into the ugly trading of insults, with council leader Mike Whitby ridiculing Labour as a collection of "buffoons" unable to read and intent on maligning Birmingham.
/ But, ending up looking like / Buffoons full of nerve.
Is this why the buffoons of the council won't make mention of Paradise Street, and opted for Liverpool One, because of its connection with the spice trade and s lavery?
Lewis (1898-1963) objected to any filming of the Narnia chronicles because he feared that his colourful animal characters would be relegated to buffoons. But director Andrew Adamson and his team seamlessly blend humans and animals in stunning visual engagements and action sequences.
In the campaigns, which critics consider misandry (the opposite of misogyny], men act like buffoons, ogling cars and women; are likened to dogs; and bungle every possible household task.