bufflehead

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Synonyms for bufflehead

small North American diving duck

References in periodicals archive ?
The distinctive geographic distribution of Buffleheads and White-winged Scoters around the Salt Lagoon area on St.
The morning continued at a rapid pace and before long we had an assortment of goldeneyes and buffleheads in the boat.
(Bufflehead; PC2001 = 10.73%, PC2013 = 0.71%, [G.sub.1] = 10.5, P < 0.005), Anas strepera L.
Inside Minchk's tender lay a trio of drake buffleheads, a redhead and a pair of bluebills.
For folks into birds (the kind you won't be eating later) now's prime time for buffleheads and mergansers, eagles, pileated woodpeckers, and if the weather holds, a flock of nearly 20 noisy parrots roosting in the trees on the east lip of the loop.
I have six pairs of ducks at present - they are Hooded Mergansers, Smews, Buffleheads and Teals.
Philopatry, nest-site fidelity, and reproductive performance in buffleheads. Auk, 107:126-132.
The number of Buffleheads that have reached Britain does not extend into double figures so its appearance was quite an event.
So do the green-winged teals, the mallards, and the buffleheads.
Still, we chipped away, collecting a surf scoter, an unexpected green-winged teal and a pair of buffleheads in addition to the occasional redhead.
Where it enters the lake, a gunner can lean against the bleached skeletons of dead trees to ambush goldeneyes, redheads, canvasbacks, buffleheads and scaup.
When Lake Erie freezes to its maximum extent, impressive flocks of common goldeneyes, common mergansers, buffleheads and diving ducks such as canvasback and greater and lesser scaup can be found here in the open water.
Role of food in territoriality and egg production of Buffleheads (Bucephala albeola) and Barrow's Goldeneyes (Bucephala islandica).
In Massachusetts, that means hunting mergansers, long-tailed ducks, buffleheads, black, surf, and white-winged scoters - or eiders.
The millponds are good places to see cormorants jutting their beaks in the air, ring-necked ducks, buffleheads, mallards and even bald eagles, which will eat the ducks as readily as they will fish, Ferland said.