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Synonyms for browse

skim

Synonyms

Synonyms for browse

to look through reading matter casually

Synonyms for browse

vegetation (such as young shoots, twigs, and leaves) that is suitable for animals to eat

reading superficially or at random

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the act of feeding by continual nibbling

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feed as in a meadow or pasture

look around casually and randomly, without seeking anything in particular

eat lightly, try different dishes

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References in periodicals archive ?
05); and striped maple, beaked hazel, and mountain maple were browsed in proportion to their availability (P > 0.
Balsam fir and red maple were browsed much more intensively than mountain maple, indicating a greater preference.
Eastern hemlock had a low availability, yet ranked second in contributing to moose diets and was the most intensively browsed species.
Under this latter situation the CAG on twigs may be much larger in effect decreasing the amount of twig in excess of the CAG that may be browsed.
In winter, the bare current shoots of these species are also browsed, along with the current shoots (twigs and needles) of two conifers, Pinus sylvestris in Fennoscandia and Russia and Abies balsamea, particularly in the Maritime Provinces and New England, in North America.
1998), except when a food species is rare, whereupon it is heavily and repeatedly browsed (Brandner et al.
Long shoot dry mass, leaf dry mass, leaf number, leaf area, and chlorophyll and N content of leaves on long shoots are higher on moderately browsed B.
Balsam fir (Abies balsamea) generally shows very little compensatory growth following browsing, and browsed stems eventually become progressively weaker and then die (Brandner et al.
Mean numbers of browsed twigs / ha did not significantly differ among ecoregions in 1977 (P = 0.
In 1977, the most commonly browsed species were Canada yew, mountain maple, balsam fir, and white birch which made up 31, 16, 13, and 12% of the browsed twigs, respectively.
Species browsed by moose in greater proportions relative to their availability in 1977 decreased in availability by 1996 (Table 3).