reed

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Words related to reed

tall woody perennial grasses with hollow slender stems especially of the genera Arundo and Phragmites

United States journalist who reported on the October Revolution from Petrograd in 1917

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United States physician who proved that yellow fever is transmitted by mosquitoes (1851-1902)

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a vibrator consisting of a thin strip of stiff material that vibrates to produce a tone when air streams over it

References in periodicals archive ?
PERTH: 2.05 Broken Reed, 2.35 Iron Man, 3.05 Talarive, 3.40 Nerone, 4.15 Big-And-Bold, 4.45 Telemoss, 5.15 Amstecos.
(For the record, the prophet's warnings were ignored, Egypt proved to be a "broken reed" [cf.
Too often these days it is dismissed as a broken reed. But he demonstrated that the UN system as a whole, including its Specialized Agencies, has done an immense amount of good for humanity.
The publishing deal, which had only been agreed orally, related to the release of 'Operation Broken Reed: Truman's Spy Mission Behind Chinese Lines That Averted a Third World War' which was written by Peterson with retired Lt.
One of the abiding memories of the World Cup was watching Owen trudge off after 90 minutes of torture in Shizuoka, a broken reed, crushed by the demands of a season and fears over his fragile health.
Today countless modern idioms--among them, "sour grapes," "like a lamb to the slaughter," "a broken reed," and "forever and ever"--can be traced to biblical roots.
And he reminds us how often--and perhaps how unwittingly--we still speak the words of that miraculous committee: labor of love, lick the dust, clear as crystal, a thorn in the flesh, a soft answer, the root of all evil, the fat of the land, the sweat of thy brow, hip and thigh, arose as one man, a broken reed, a word in season, how the might y are fallen, the eleventh hour, pearls before swine, a law unto themselves, weighed in the balance and found wanting, the shadow of death.
If Westminster's powers cannot extend to putting that little matter right, then it's a broken reed.