broadax


Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia.
Graphic Thesaurus  🔍
Display ON
Animation ON
Legend
Synonym
Antonym
Related
  • noun

Synonyms for broadax

a large ax with a broad cutting blade

References in periodicals archive ?
(77) DEAN, Warren, IFith Broadax and Firebrand The Destruction of the Brazilian AtlanticForest Berkeley University of California Press, 1995; FUNES MONZONTE, Reinaldo, De Bosque a Sabana.
Logger californicus is represented by a display of hobnailed boots, a broadax, and a cant hook.
At the Prairie Pebble Company, only blacks found their paychecks docked for "medical insurance." In lumber camps, blacks performed the heaviest work but were not allowed to cut railroad ties: "It is not well," explained one owner, "to encourage them to use the broadax."
Prucha, Francis P., Broadax and Bayonet: The Role of the United States Army in the Development of the Northwest, 1815-1860.
En la decada de 1990, bajo el estimulo de la reunion de Rio, continuo el surgimiento de importantes aportes como el de Fernando Tudela titulado Desarrollo y medio ambiente en America Latina: Una vision evolutiva, auspiciado por el gobierno espanol; de Guillermo Castro se publico Los trabajos de ajuste y combate: Naturaleza y sociedad en America Latina, dos tomos con recopilaciones hechas por Bernardo Garcia y Maria del Rosario Prieto; Plaga de ovejas: consecuencias ambientales de la conquista de Mexico de Elinor Melville y, ademas, un nuevo texto de Warren Dean, With Broadax and Firebrand, The Destruction of the Brazilian Atlantic Forest.
consecuencias ambientales de la conquista de Mexico, Mexico, fondo de Cultura Economica, 1999); DEAN, Warren, ILith Broadax and Firebrand, The Destruction of the Brazilian Atlantic Forest, Berkeley, University of California Press, 1995.
Miller's frequent allusions to Dean are surprising since this book is different in so many ways from Dean's With Broadax and Firebrand (Berkeley, 1995).
Split Shingle--A rough, flat, roofing shingle, split from a shingle bolt, usually by a broadax or a froe; a shake.
Accompanied with a few illustrations on how to hew and a couple of axes, neither of which was a broadax, we attempted to create timbers.
They were seven men, armed with one hatchet and a broadax. Twenty-four hours later, they would be seventy and at least fifty-seven Whites would be dead.
Azucar, deforestacion y medio ambiente en Cuba, 1492-1926 (Mexico: Siglo XXI Editores, 2003), Shawn Williams, "Fuelwood in Colonial Brazil: The Economic and Social Consequences of Fuel Depletion for the Bahian Reconcavo, 1549-1820", Forest and Conservation History, 38 (1994):181-192; Warren Dean, With Broadax and Firebrand The Destruction of the Brazilian Atlantic Forest (Berkeley, California: University of California Press, 1995), 174-177; David Watts, The West Indies: Patterns of Development, Culture, and Environmental Change since 1492 (New York: Cambridge University Press, 1987).
Five hundred years later, "squat warriors, dark-haired, armed with broadaxes and hatchets and swords and spears and clubs" try to settle this "land of rocks" but are driven mad by boredom and the wine they make from the meagre vegetation on the island and one night "run howling into the teeth of the storm-surf" and are lost (92,93).
The famed coopers at Robertson's Windmill in Williamsburg still shape their staves with broadaxes, planes, and drawknives, then gather them in a circle secured by a ring.
In tools such as swing blades, chisels, plane blades, draw knives, adzes and special broadaxes we have one side of the bevel as the flat side of the tool body and the angled side forming a long slope to it.