bristlecone pine


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Related to bristlecone pine: Great Basin Bristlecone Pine
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Synonyms for bristlecone pine

small slow-growing upland pine of western United States (Rocky Mountains) having dense branches with fissured rust-brown bark and short needles in bunches of 5 and thorn-tipped cone scales

References in periodicals archive ?
I invited my son, Elijah, to join me, knowing he wouldn't be able to resist an adventure in a park we hadn't yet been to, especially one where starry nights and ancient bristlecone pines beckoned.
The oldest living tree in the world is Methuselah, an intermountain bristlecone pine that sprouted in the White Mountains of California during the Early Bronze Age around 2,833 BCE.
arizonica), Engelmann spruce (Picea engelmannii), and bristlecone pine (Pinus aristata) occurred at elevations >2,440 m on the San Francisco Peaks.
The world''s tallest tree is California's coast redwood (Sequoia sempervirens) The world''s oldest-growing tree is a bristlecone pine (Pinus aristata)
A multi-faceted approach describes the voice, function, and beauty of each tree or family of trees chosen to represent North American trees of the west Twelve sections in four chapters present the Coastal Redwood, Pacific Madrone, Old Growth Forest, California Sycamore, Mexican Elder, California Bay Laurel, Incense Cedar, Mountain Mahogany, Sequoia, Quaking Aspen, Bristlecone Pine, and Gambrel Oak/ Western Serviceberry tree groups.
Methuselah, a Great Basin bristlecone pine, can be found in Inyo County, California.
Literally nothing is older than a bristlecone pine tree: The oldest and longest-living species on the planet, these pine trees normally are found clinging to bare rocky landscapes of alpine or near-alpine mountain slopes.
It is best viewed from across the Owens Valley at the top of the Ancient Bristlecone Pine Forest, home to Methuselah, considered to be the oldest tree in the world at the robust age of 4,842.
Ecologist Adelia Barber, for example, scouts the rugged and largely inaccessible terrain of California's White Mountains seeking the long-lived bristlecone pine. Barber, of the University of California, Santa Cruz, has found that Google Earth's resolution of that swatch of the globe is good enough for her to tell a bristlecone forest from a stand of pinon pine, greatly simplifying her efforts to map and study bristlecones.
Living Long Bristlecone pine (Pinus longaeva) is more than 4,800 years old, predating virtually all recorded history.
The oldest trees are the bristlecone pine (Pinus longaeva) found in the White Mountains of California at above 3000 m elevation.
Channel catfish 40 Asian elephant 80 Human 122 Box turtle 138 Galapagos tortoise 188 Bowhead whale 211 Quahog clam 220 Red oak 326 Giant sequoia 3,200 Bristlecone pine 4,700 Creosote bush 11,700
"Prometheus," a 4,900-year-old bristlecone pine tree, was cut up and sectioned for scientific research in 1964.
The peaks of the American West hold the Bristlecone Pine, some of the world's oldest trees, and THE BRISTLECONE BOOK celebrates their natural history using a most accessible format and presentation perfect for any natural history collection focusing on botany.
"Bryce Canyon in Utah was equally striking because of the twisted and gnarled trunks of the 1,000-year-old Bristlecone pine trees and the blood red trunks of ponderosa pine in stark contrast with the pale pink of the rock.