breastfeed

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"If they're racing to this space to breast-feed and back to their office, and don't feel their direct supervisor is supportive, it can be very stressful."
[11,12] Appropriate feeding during illness is important to prevent nutritional deficiencies and in the present study, 88.23% continued to breast-feed their infants during episodes of diarrhoea.
The Lansinoh survey went on to note that women's reluctance to breast-feed was driven by more than just the fear of public embarrassment.
Three-quarters of respondents who had intended to breast-feed exclusively felt that hospital staff generally encouraged the practice.
She said: "I could only breast-feed for four weeks because I suffered from really bad mastitis (an inflammation of the breast causing it to become painful, red and swollen).
The researchers didn't randomly assign women to breast-feed or formula feed, but studied healthy and HIV-infected women who chose to breast-feed only, bottle-feed only, or supplement breast-feeding with formula, milk, or solid foods.
"We decided to withdraw after it became clear our bill would have been watered down and most likely vetoed by the then-governor," said Mary Ann Kerwin, Colorado Breast-feeding Task Force Legislation Representative and one of the authors of Colorado's law protecting a woman's right to breast-feed in public.
Oregon has the highest breast-feeding rates in the country based on a number of measures - women who ever breast-feed, those who breast-feed at six months and at 12 months, and those who breast-feed exclusively at three months and six months.
SIR - As of March 18 mothers in Scotland now have the legal right to breast-feed in public, as a result of a landmark Bill passed by the Scottish Parliament in November last year.
In fact, the CDC smallpox fact sheet states that it is safe for a woman to breast-feed her baby if a close contact received smallpox vaccine, provided that the vaccinee follows the standard procedures for hand washing and site protection.
That doesn't mean women shouldn't breast-feed for less than three months if that works best for them.
According to the 1998 data compiled by the surgeon general's office, only 45 percent of Black mothers breast-feed their children immediately after birth, compared to 68 percent of Whites and 66 percent of Hispanics.
In 1997, former ITN newscaster Pamela Armstrong revealed she had continued to breast-feed her son in public morning and night until he was 31/1 years old.
When you breast-feed, you don't have to sterilize bottles.