brazilwood


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Related to brazilwood: pernambuco wood
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Synonyms for brazilwood

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But perhaps of even greater importance was the exceptional state of preservation of the cargo that originally included 1,600 kilograms of indigo in wooden barrels, and, for the red dyes, 2,300 kilograms of soluble brazilwood and almost 9,000 kilograms of madder.
On mainland South America, the Portuguese crown monopolized brazilwood for itself in the imperial colony named for the dyewood.
This quest for authenticity initiated Amaral's Pau-Brasil (Brazilwood) style, in which she combined naive painting with Cubism.
Brazilwood from Central and South American produces a range of color from rust to peach, and logwood is used for blues, grays and purple."
Fabaceae Bilai hatli Biancaea sappan (L.) Todaro English: False sandalwood, Indian brazilwood, Indian redwood, Sappanwood 18 Cassia sophera L., syn.
(2006), examining Caesalpinia echinata (Brazilwood), observed that the seeds lost viability when maintained under environmental temperature due to the loss of glucose and fructose compared to sucrose.
If your heart is set on red in your tattoo, ask around to see if any tattoo parlors in your area are willing to work with non-metallic organic pigments that lend a red color such as carmine, scarlet lake, sandalwood or brazilwood. There are non-metallic alternatives available for many other popular tattoo ink shades, too.
Brazilwood made a cheap red dye, but one which rapidly faded; madder produced a more consistent russet red colour.
In 1924, Andrade published a manifesto announcing a new school of poetry that he called "Pau Brasil," or "Brazilwood." Although he published the manifesto in Rio de Janeiro, he was living in Paris and was interested in cultural primitivism.
(66) Brazil as a name for America first appeared on the map in the planisphere Orbis Typus Universalis Tabula, produced in Venice in 1511 by Jeronimo Marini, although the name Rio de Brasil, arising from the discovery of brazilwood at that location by Goncalo Coelho and Amerigo Vespucci during their voyage of 1501-1502, appeared earlier on the Cantino mappemonde of 1502.
Premium cachacas are aged in a variety of woods, including chestnut, brazilwood and almond.
Holmfirth-based Rowan Yarn has created a range of knitting yarn from 100% organic cotton that uses natural dyes such as Brazilwood and Madder.
Pan Ferro, Pernambuco, Brazilwood, Violin tree (Caesalpinnia echinata): Native to Brazil.