boundary

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  • noun

Synonyms for boundary

Synonyms for boundary

the line or area separating geopolitical units

Synonyms for boundary

References in periodicals archive ?
For us, we only re-align the boundaries and those of the wards," he said.
The residents blamed politicians from the county who served in past regimes for lacking a goodwill to protect the county boundaries.
Theres also a provision for creating a simplified pathway for minor boundary change proposals that can be used to remove historical or smaller anomalies in council boundaries.
Moreover, attendance boundaries present a variety of unexpected and difficult challenges, given the counterintuitive relationships between schools and the attendance boundaries they serve.
The main objective is to show how the usage of the markers changed over the centuries, and how linear boundaries became more significant and precise due to technical improvements in land surveys.
As we discuss boundaries, bear in mind the following considerations:
Curiously, instances of excessively thick boundaries don't tend to get recognized as having an ethical dimension in the way that inappropriately permeable boundaries do.
Indeed, some students of urban affairs believe that a key to improved delivery of local public services rests in much greater flexibility among municipal boundaries.
The majority of Joe Walker students advance to Quartz Hill High School, but the White Fence Farms area is within the boundaries of Highland High School.
Therefore, unlike the health council districts, the LHIN areas cross municipal boundaries.
Looking at Challenging the Boundaries of Slavery as a whole, we have a remarkably illuminating study of the ecology of slavery: its boundaries of time and space reviewed so that what is understood is slavery in its terrains, economies, and confluences.
Nevertheless, the case of Dolly illustrates the visceral reaction--sometimes called the Yuk-factor--that arises when "natural" boundaries are violated.
One characteristic of comfortable relationships is that the people involved have a great deal of respect for both each other's personal boundaries and their own.
Breaking Boundaries, on the other hand, is a monograph, in which Smith, drawing primarily upon the theories of Bakhtin, Stephen Greenblatt, Michel de Certeau, and Gregory Bateson (2), argues that English theater after 1585 features a growing interest in breaking social and theatrical boundaries, culminating in "the complete dissolution of boundaries between theater, punitive practice and carnival play in the 'social drama' of 1649" (137).