water

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Synonyms for water

liquid

Synonyms

get wet

Synonyms

  • get wet
  • cry
  • weep
  • become wet
  • exude water

hold water

Synonyms

in hot water

Synonyms

  • in trouble
  • in a mess

pour cold water on or over something

water something down

Synonyms

Synonyms for water

to lessen the strength of by or as if by admixture

to fill with tears

Synonyms

Synonyms for water

once thought to be one of four elements composing the universe (Empedocles)

a liquid necessary for the life of most animals and plants

supply with water, as with channels or ditches or streams

provide with water

secrete or form water, as tears or saliva

Related Words

fill with tears

Related Words

References in periodicals archive ?
Drought intensity effects on genotypic differences in tissue affinity for strongly bound water. Plant Sci., 132: 121-126.
The value of [RCH.sub.CE] is related to the chemical compositions of Portland cement and can be obtained from the experimentally determined calcium hydroxide content and chemically bound water content in Portland cement paste.
More detailed knowledge of bound water properties in the cornea can be used to refine the model in future.
Komarova, "Model of dielectric constant of bound water in soil for applications of microwave remote sensing," Progress In Electromagnetics Research, Vol.
(1997) reported that a decrease in very weakly bound water and an increase in the amount of tightly or moderately bound water would produce a markedly increased freezing tolerance in winter wheat.
A second falling rate period occurs after only bound water exists.
ALICE will measure the reflectivity of the plume as it rises into the sunlight, enabling scientists to distinguish between water vapor, water ice, and hydrated minerals (such as salts or clays) with molecularly bound water.
The dielectric permittivity of water in thin water films surrounding soil particles ('bound water') is much lower than that of free water ([[epsilon].sub.fw] [approximately not equal to] 81).
Constant-rate drying is usually associated with removal of free water from particle surface and the falling-rate period with bound water inside particles.
It contains bound water, which causes particles to expand into closed-cell spheres at temperatures above 300 F.
In these broad patches, Boynton and Feldman suggest, the rock may contain minerals with chemically bound water (as OH), such as clays.
"Moisture Sorption" explains water activity in foods and shows why commonly held ideas on free and bound water are often inaccurate.
Among their findings was that three endothermic physiochemical transformations occur during heating: release of moisture between room temperature and 212F (100C), burnout of organic compounds between 572-932F (300-500C), and release of chemically bound water in the range of 932-1652F (500-900C).
Accordingly, the temperature is increased to desorb bound water, such as water of crystallization, until the water content falls to the range required for optimum product stability.
The volume of these bound water molecules is significantly lower than that of free water in solution.