boomer


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Synonyms for boomer

a member of the baby boom generation in the 1950s

References in periodicals archive ?
- Many businesses are hyper-targeting marketing efforts to millennials and Gen Z, but new research1 released today highlights the shopping patterns of the older, larger core generations: Gen X and baby boomers. Both generations regularly buy via multi-channel experiences, with 82 percent of Gen Xers and boomers surveyed buying in-store at least monthly, and 46 percent of Gen Xers and 40 percent of boomers surveyed shopping online at least monthly.
Many Baby Boomers look back and miss those old days, but surprising, hilarious, and even shocking stories hid in Dark Shadows despite so many Happy Days.
Figures from the Office for National Statistics show that a higher proportion of World War One baby boomers remained childless compared to those who came after them.
Not only that, more boomers think they can determine their post-work expenses and have the tools to figure out the retirement puzzle.
Boomer got his unique name because Phelps wanted "something different and something cool," the Olympian said on a Facebook Live chat, according to (http://www.si.com/olympics/2016/05/09/michael-phelps-baby-boomer-robert-name-choice-explained) Sports Illustrated . The baby's middle name, Robert, is an ode to Phelps' coach, Bob Bowman, and his grandmother, Roberta.
While the economy has bounced back in recent years, many boomers have not.
"Research has shown that [older] customers' final decisions are not the direct product of the reasoning process; in fact, emotions drive Boomer and older customers in their purchase decisions.
Baby boomers, the ubiquitous post-World War II generation that changed the way America thought, worked, played and conducted business, is in the throes of entering retirement.
Baby boomers are leaving an indelible mark on American culture by reinterpreting "age" and inventing a new life stage.
This article is part of an ongoing series analyzing how baby boomers -- those born from 1946 to 1964 in the U.S.
Of middle-income boomers not working with a financial professional, four in 10 (39 percent) don't seek financial advice because they prefer to make their own financial decisions.
More than half of the oldest boomers and their spouses have fully retired and are not working, according to a new report.
Still, drug channel retailers hold lower than average share among younger boomers, likely due to particularly low share across sizeable categories, including soap, toothpaste, vitamins and internal analgesics within the younger boomer cohort.
This month's Producer Roundtable feature (page 38) is filled with great ideas from three top producers who specialize in boomer clients about how to get them interested in long-term care, whole life, immediate annuities and more and then integrate those products into their retirement plans.
It may go without saying, but the nearly 20-year age spread of the Boomer group means you can't just mass market to them.