bog myrtle


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  • noun

Synonyms for bog myrtle

perennial plant of Europe and America having racemes of white or purplish flowers and intensely bitter trifoliate leaves

References in periodicals archive ?
We only produce Wirral Gin on this still because the key botanical, Bog Myrtle, has such a strong fragrance that we can't produce any other spirits on the still without them taking on the Wirral Gin flavours.
Bog myrtle also adds a rather sweet aroma to the air on non-windy days and it's easy to see why humans have applied various uses to this peat-loving shrub over the centuries.
The name Caorunn translates as "rowan" in Gaelic; rowan berries are a key component in this spirit, along with highland heather and bog myrtle, as well as more traditional botanicals such as juniper, citrus and angelica.
Other possibilities include bog myrtle, German chamomile, sandalwood, tomato and vetiver (Chrysopogon zizaniodes).
It uses grain spirit, Scottish water and caorunn - the Gaelic name for the rowan berry - plus apple, heather, bog myrtle, dandelion, juniper, coriander seed, orange and lemon peel, and more, to make a crisp, full-bodied, dry gin which sells at around EUR27.
leatherleaf (Chamaedaphne calyculata), bog myrtle (Myrica gale), black spruce (Picea mariana), and tamarack trees (Larix laricina) grow in bogs.
So with a bottle of mead, a bottle of Bog Myrtle ale, a bottle of Scottish pine needle ale.
Try a dollop of marsh samphire pickle or shaggy cap ketchup - and don't forget heather-favoured beer and bog myrtle in your wine.
Originally, the dyes employed would have come from natural sources--black from alder bark, yellow from bog myrtle, red from lichen--and the colors used in individual tartans would be determined, by and large, by the availability of vegetable dyes.
The rare herb, bog myrtle, may hold the key to a cure for modern ailments such as depression, centuries after Vikings used it to go `beserk'.
However other spices can be and are used as well: spruce, bog myrtle, rosehips, juniper, coriander, peppers and anise are just a few.
WIRRAL now has its own gin, made in a copper pot still known as Thumbelina and infused with Bog Myrtle.
He is a also a private chef and forager, who seeks out everything from wild mushrooms, sorrel, yarrow and bog myrtle to flavour his dishes.
Ynglyn a'r myrtwydd, myrtys communis, mae rhai yn ei gamgymryd a'r Helygen Fair, Bog Myrtle, myrnia gale.