blunder

(redirected from blunderingly)
Also found in: Dictionary.
Graphic Thesaurus  🔍
Display ON
Animation ON
Legend
Synonym
Antonym
Related
  • all
  • noun
  • verb

Synonyms for blunder

make a mistake

Synonyms

Antonyms

  • be correct
  • get it right
  • be exact

stumble

Synonyms

Synonyms for blunder

to move awkwardly or clumsily

to proceed or perform in an unsteady, faltering manner

Synonyms for blunder

References in periodicals archive ?
(OB 68) Backed into a corner by Beechum's sly taunts, Corky blunderingly refers to the unspoken racial dynamic underpinning his reception at Club Zanzibar, thereby committing a strategic error that allows his rival to deliver a stinging blow: "Corky says, stammering slightly, '--L-Like I'm not wanted here for one reason and one reason only....
industries that blunderingly exhausted their resources within fifty
In essence, we can (imperfectly) see things from others' perspective and (blunderingly) walk a mile in their moccasins (Coulehan, 1995, 1997).
The irony of the situation is that the very behaviors they specifically warn against have in large part already been blunderingly repeated in our current crisis, and it is only a matter of time to see if their predictions now come true or if anything can be done to prevent them.
Like one of the less intelligent breeds of dog, they are endearingly, blunderingly straightforward.
There were still things Parliament could not do: adopt statutes "impossible to be performed." So, something of what Coke had said could be raked from the fires of the Civil War: some statutes were truly "of no validity." Chancellor Kent, blunderingly, took matters farther.
Everything about Wollin's behaviour confirms their suspicions, and they pick up various clues which point to his guilt; they leave rather proud of their `Sherlocking' until they realize that they have blunderingly alerted Wollin to the real motive for their visit.
These bleak facts Cicero himself did much to explain and extenuate,(19) and indeed it is in Cicero, though he reflects the Romans' acknowledgement of their late start, indeed of their barbarism,(20) of their role as mere translators,(21) or, more boldly, as imitators,(22) that the first sparks are struck of an explicit intention and desire to rival the senior culture,(23) just at the time when (blunderingly) Cornelius Nepos and then (more or less definitively) Atticus, as followed by Cicero, as soon as the liber annalis became available, laid down the relative chronological framework.(24) Thus at Cic.