whistle

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Synonyms for whistle

the sound made by something moving rapidly or by steam coming out of a small aperture

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the act of signalling (e.g., summoning) by whistling or blowing a whistle

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a small wind instrument that produces a whistling sound by blowing into it

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acoustic device that forces air or steam against an edge or into a cavity and so produces a loud shrill sound

an inexpensive fipple flute

make whistling sounds

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move with, or as with, a whistling sound

utter or express by whistling

move, send, or bring as if by whistling

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make a whining, ringing, or whistling sound

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give a signal by whistling

References in periodicals archive ?
Ms Manigault Newman suggested there was more to come, saying: "There's a lot of very corrupt things happening in the White House and I am going to blow the whistle on a lot of them."
If something bothers you is it time to blow the whistle? The term 'blow the whistle' comes from the days when the Police blew a whistle to catch a thief.
Grenny offers eight tips to blow the whistle while not processing your career:
The results showed that there is no relationship between the values and intentions of the prospective teachers to blow the whistle externally, and anonymously.
What you can do: Identify disconnects between ethics and action in your own work, then blow the whistle on yourself.
Referee Chris Hague decided to blow the whistle on the feuding youngsters five minutes into the second half of the game in Prestatyn.
Earlier studies are not clear on why employees blow the whistle, exploring factors such as age, gender and time on the job, but providing inconsistent results, according to the new report.
"Most of the people who blow the whistle first go to the internal hierarchy and try to tell people that something's wrong--80% of them stop at that point," divulges Janet Near, chair of the Department of Management and Entrepreneurship at Indiana University, Bloomington.
Given such common negative outcomes, why do certain individuals step up and decide to blow the whistle? This question has intrigued managers and researchers alike, because understanding the whistle-blowing decision-making process helps create policies and procedures resulting in the greatest ethical benefits for organizations and society.
I am elated to see in Briefs that the diocesan council in Belleville, Ill., was willing to blow the whistle on Bishop Edward Braxton (NCR, Jan.
Whistleblowers have often claimed that cash rewards or financial incentives had no impact on their decision to blow the whistle, and Miceli and Near further report that very few federal employees said that cash awards would encourage them to blow the whistle.
One in five employees, working for multinational companies in Europe, say they won't blow the whistle if they suspect a case of fraud, bribery or corruption in their organisation, according to a study by Ernst & Young.
Lee Steege, 17, is desperate to blow the whistle after passing the nineweek FA programme.
The answer may be difficult to do but is necessary-they need to blow the whistle.
There is no incentive--except the moral obligation to tell the truth--to blow the whistle on government fraud, only disincentives.