bloodstream

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  • noun

Synonyms for bloodstream

circulation

Synonyms

Synonyms for bloodstream

the blood flowing through the circulatory system

References in periodicals archive ?
A major advance came in 1998 when Dennis Lo, now at the Chinese University of Hong Kong, and his colleagues reported that fetal DNA circulates freely outside of cells in a pregnant woman's bloodstream. Lo notes that this genetic material seems to make its way into maternal blood when placental cells die, rupture, and spill their contents into the mother's bloodstream.
Rather than waiting years for the presentation of neurological disorders and assorted ailments and cancers to indicate a product's unsuitability for consumer use, why don't we require that new products be proven safe before they are disseminated throughout our lives and bloodstreams?
The study showed these effects are due to something in the younger mice's bloodstream activating so-called ``progenitor cells'' in the older animals.
To transform this first microswimmer into a device that carries out a specific task in the bloodstream would require many improvements, notes Jerome Bibette of the French group.
If injected into the bloodstream of test animals, they can circulate intact at the near-neutral blood pH of 7.4, he says.
Women with the autoimmune disease scleroderma are more likely to have these persistent cells in their bloodstream than women without the disease (SN: 8/2/97, p.
Once attached to the tissues, the spheres' shells erode, slowly releasing the contents into the bloodstream.
The New York team followed the 400 women through their pregnancies and found striking differences in the amount of vitamin C in their bloodstreams. On average, the smokers had 15 percent less vitamin C than the nonsmokers.
Lipoprotein(a) belongs to a class of cholesterol-carrying molecules that circulate in the bloodstream. This lipidprotein conjugate, whose function remains mysterious, was discovered in 1963.
The antibody, named CDP571, remained in the bloodstreams of a second group of healthy monkeys for roughly one week without causing an immune reaction, Bodmer and his colleagues observed.
That basic question proves tricky to answer, because there's no direct connection between the maternal and fetal bloodstreams. The two systems are separated by the complex structure known as the placenta, which functions as a highly selective gatekeeper.