blazon

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Related to blazons: feigns, Dirges
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Synonyms for blazon

Synonyms for blazon

the official symbols of a family, state, etc

References in periodicals archive ?
Balizet remind the reader that male bodies can also be the subject of blazon: like the blazons of female bodies which are discussed elsewhere, male blazons can also be loaded with violence, humiliation, and de-humanization.
Because the book's two main contributions to scholarly debate are to assert that staged blazons are 'at once reliant on, yet distinct from the lyric' (9) and to assert that anyone can be a blasonneur, rather than just male characters performing an act of erotic violence, the book ultimately turns attention to the role that the theatrical audience plays in the blazoning of the staged body.
The cohesion rests in its persistent statement that blazons can be performed and active, rather than textual and passive; blazons are witnessed rather than read, enacted rather than spoken.
Staging the Blazon in Early Modern English Theatre.
Sara Morrison's contribution argues that Isabella in Measure for Measure and the Duchess in The Duchess of Malfi are not the subjects of male blazon.
Ortiz's essay refreshingly makes the case that in Shakespeare's history plays, blazon need not be a component of violent or sexual imagery at all.
The anthology The Body in Parts presents itself as a kind of critical blazon of the early modern body, each essay focusing on some body part which, in its negotiations with the whole, frustrates and suspends attempts towards a corporate unity.
Hermione's uncertain state between living and dead allows Kellett to explore the blazon through an incorporeal body.
Starks-Estes investigates the blazon being staged literally in TitusAndronicus.
Ortiz investigates other uses for the blazon apart from erotic desire.
As such, Staging the Blazon in Early Modern English Theatre is an essential contribution to early modern studies.
Part 3, "Dramatizing Dismemberment," includes: Patricia Marchesi, "'Limbs mangled and torn asunder': Dismemberment, Theatricality, and the Blazon in Christopher Marlowe's Doctor Faustus" (85-96); Ariane M.