biodegrade

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Words related to biodegrade

break down naturally through the action of biological agents

References in periodicals archive ?
Such polymers are tested to biodegrade, but only in the particular conditions found in industrial composting.
The world needs a new type of plastic one that will perform well, but will also biodegrade much faster than the plastics we use today.
Ramani Narayan, an international expert on Biodegradability and a professor of Chemical Engineering & Materials Science at the Michigan State University, "When plastic is combined with an oxo-biodegradable proprietary application method used to produce films, bags, etc., this product, when discarded in soil in the presence of micro-organisms, moisture and oxygen, completely biodegrades decomposing into simple material found in nature leaving no residue or harmful toxins." (Source:bpiworld.org)
Normal nitrile gloves take decades, if not hundreds of years, to biodegrade and break down in landfill whereas the biodegradation rate of Green-DEX[TM] is far more rapid.
Once injected, the Regenoss-I encourages new bone tissue to grow and replace it while the material biodegrades over six months.
It is D2W certified, meaning that it biodegrades at a fast rate.
Plastic accounted for 74.5% of the litter, which the MCS said was particularly worrying as plastic never biodegrades.
Is it true that nothing really "biodegrades" in a landfill?
An inherent difficulty with using domestic wastewater as a raw material, however, is that it contains a lot of matter that biodegrades slowly, says Rabaey.
have seen success in producing a high quality finish phone case that biodegrades easily in compost.
Catharines, Ontario, has worked together with Jiffy Pots to develop and patent the EARTHready peat pot, which biodegrades in one growing season and is made of sphagnum peat moss and wood pulp.
Normally, living tissue such as skin rots from a carcass as it biodegrades, or decays.
And when starch biodegrades it creates micro-voids in plastics products, exposing more surface area to attack by photodegradable agents.
The packaging biodegrades in composting environments.