binding

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Related to bindingness: conferred, reconfirm, pay heed, vitiation
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Synonyms for binding

Synonyms for binding

the capacity to attract and hold something

strip sewn over or along an edge for reinforcement or decoration

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the act of applying a bandage

one of a pair of mechanical devices that are attached to a ski and that will grip a ski boot

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the protective covering on the front, back, and spine of a book

executed with proper legal authority

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References in periodicals archive ?
The first is that it seems to beg the question by assuming (the bindingness of the moral law) what the argument sets out to prove (the validity of Kant's a priori concepts of morality).
Although such bindingness is critical, it is not the only feature that renders internal administrative measures lawlike.
the ratio of the imported quantity to the quota limit) as a more continuous measure of quota bindingness.
214) While an emphasis on the bindingness of precedent to the exclusion of other interpretive methods might suggest a departure from pragmatism, that is certainly not Posner's approach here.
can they account for disagreements about the legal bindingness of
165) Litigation testing the juridical quality and bindingness of treaties in this period demonstrates a full range of argument about the status of Indian nations, their law, and their lands.
A law was only a law if it was based on a norm, which in turn Kelsen defined as something that controlled action and compelled subjects to behave as the norms required--in other words, the test for normativity was bindingness.
It is true that wacd has to be binding, but the purpose of bindingness of wacd is to avoid harm.
The bindingness hypothesis, see supra note 72, may also yield a necessary condition on a legal institution.
72) Lawyers such as Jack Goldsmith and Eric Posner have adapted these realist insights to international law and international relations, and generally found the bindingness of international legal arrangements to be wanting in a world where states constantly compete.
Against this, as Stern shows in some fine pages analyzing Kant's references to God in the Groundwork and elsewhere, Kant wants to establish that the bindingness of morality "must be seen to come from our reason" itself (62).
It seems that by authority, bindingness and "oomph," Joyce just means whatever it is that makes moral reasons seem more binding and important, regardless of agents' desires, than the reasons of fashion and etiquette.
This challenge concerns the reconciliation of two of the theory's features: on the one hand, its dependence on a pre-rational choice (the "choice to live"), and on the other hand, its objectivity and bindingness.
Such adaptations are, however, more of a symbolic nature and therefore rather unlikely to restrict the enforceability and legal bindingness of EU legislation across the EEA.