beach plum


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Related to beach plum: beach plum bush
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Synonyms for beach plum

seacoast shrub of northeastern North America having showy white blossoms and edible purple fruit

small dark purple fruit used especially in jams and pies

References in periodicals archive ?
The company is also launching a new solid sheet line of 210 ringspun cotton in 10 muted shades, including sea glass blue, beach grass, beach plum, linen white and sand dune.
A historic concrete sea-wall with a picturesque stone ledge will be restored to its original position, with the new addition of flowering beach plum bushes to separate the wall from the lawn.
Oak, pitch pine, and beach plum joined perennial grasses and Indian nutgrass, native aster, and black-eyed Susans, among other wildflowers.
The two best known of these are the wild black cherry, prized at home and abroad for its fine lumber, and the beach plum for its fruit.
The Tea Rose, Sunflower and Beach Plum collections feature handpainted florals.
The president and first lady have also eaten dinner at three of their favorite island restaurants: Sweet Life Cafe in Oak Bluffs, State Road Restaurant in West Tisbury and Beach Plum Inn in Menemsha, voted most romantic by Martha's Vineyard Magazine.
He also enjoyed antiques and owned Beach Plum Antiques for many years.
In some areas, selected native species, such as beach plums in the Northeast or sand plums in the Midwest, may make the best homestead plums.
Black backed gulls stare wall-eyed at a place where beach plums once crowned dunes, part river's bottom, part sea's.
One element of her life remains the same--the collection of beach plums and the making of jam.
Amid the rolling, white dunes, campers learn to identify pitch pine, shadbush and beach plums.
Besides such native American produce as walnuts, chestnuts, grapes, beach plums, currants, pumpkins, squashes, crab apples, wild onions, Jerusalem artichokes, corn, and other edibles then available, the settlers and the Wampanoag Indians probably also feasted on such English vegetables as parsnips, carrots, turnips, cabbages, beets, radishes, and lettuce.