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The master cabin on the second deck has a round king size double bed and baldachin (a canopy that traditionally sits over a throne or tomb of someone important), private terrace, thick curtains, gold touches and floral carpeting.
In effect, king Joao's conjugal monument features a prominent set of recumbent effigies-holding hands, another first in Portugal-topped by richly carved baldachins; and both sides of the monument are entirely covered in the longest commemorative inscription ever written until then, duly glorifying the king and the queen; an inscription, by the way, also composed by
Over this polychrome of ears and stalks there hung, floating like a baldachin, a radiant mist of mayflies--or dames as they are locally called.
A choir intoned a Psalm, as the pope sprinkled incense on the central altar under Bernini's towering bronze baldachin before opening the service with the traditional wish for peace in Latin: "Pax vobis" ("Peace be with you").
These include depictions of the oath-taking ceremony outside the city, a plate depicting the duke progressing under a baldachin, and the closing ceremony in the Groote Markt (figs.
It was rebuilt several times and its lavish interior includes a magnificent baldachin with winged caryatids above the main altar by Francois Baillairge.
Its distinctive profile comes from its soaring buttresses, while its ethereally light interior is down to Antoni Gaudi, who opened up the space and added a wacky baldachin over the altar.
What one derives from this reading is a perception, surely more accurate historically, but, alas, one that on an aesthetic level remains essentially unchanged from that expressed by Bernard Berenson (in a letter to Isabella Stewart Gardner) over a century ago: "a squat, crowded composition, with a top heavy baldachin, and no escape whatever to the au dela." There is no denying that, standing before the Colonna Altarpiece we see a large, reasonably well preserved and well documented work by the "prince of painters" that, somehow, is far less satisfying than it ought to be--especially for its having been created at such a key juncture in this artist's career.
The author then guides a pilgrim in a walk around the typical parts of the traditional Catholic church, explaining the role (and consequently the structure and place) of the altar, the altar rail, the baldachin, the baptistry, the confessional, the facade, the gallery, the lectern, the narthex, the nave, the portal, the pulpit, the reredos, the rose window, the sanctuary, the tabernacle, etc.
This interpretation is supported by stone statuary of kneeling kings and especially relief representations of kings posed with hands on either side of "cult vessels, fetishes, standards, [and] baldachin poles." The basic meaning of this gesture is therefore protection and support.
Barnabas, Oxford)." Here Betjeman describes the displacement of God's splendor by an edifice of Byzantine grandeur and haughtiness: "Where once the fritillaries hung in the grass / A baldachin pillar is guarding the Mass.
The giant baldachin, suspended over the alabaster table altar - a wrought iron canopy symbolising the Crown of Thorns - is the work of Antoni Gaudi as are the chandeliers wrapped round the pillars which are nicknamed "the garters".
However, the number of tombs in baldachin style increased during the 14th-15th centuries, so the dating of A.
Among their objections: moving the main altar to the center of the worship space; placing an organ where the altar once stood; replacing pews with chairs, and removing the baldachin. He asks, "Are we now going to be worshiping an organ?"
He is generally seated on a throne, under a sort of baldachin, which ritualizes the space beneath it, the way a chuppah does or a canopy placed over an altar.