avascular

(redirected from avascular necrosis of the femoral head)
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  • adj

Antonyms for avascular

without blood vessels

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References in periodicals archive ?
Avascular necrosis of the femoral head: Inter - And intraobserver variations of ficat and ARCO classifications.
Bone scintigraphy equipped with a pinhole collimator for diagnosis of avascular necrosis of the femoral head. Clin Rheumatol 1997; 16: 372-7.
Portal, "Avascular necrosis of the femoral head after femoral neck fracture," Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research, vol.
Kweider et al., "Enoxaparin prevents steroid-related avascular necrosis of the femoral head," The Scientific World Journal, vol.
Avascular necrosis of the femoral head, flared long bone metaphysis/epiphysis, enlarged capitulum of the distal humerus have also been reported.
The most common abnormality detected in our study was avascular necrosis of the femoral head.
Its advantages are: greater conservation of joint stability, reduced risk of avascular necrosis of the femoral head, and postoperative infections.
Bipolar hemiarthroplasty, a modular system, has been utilized for decades to treat intracapsular fractures of the femoral neck and avascular necrosis of the femoral head. Dislocation is one of the main complications of hip hemiarthroplasty performed for displaced femoral neck fractures.
We would like to thank Sanal (1) for her interest to our paper "Avascular Necrosis of the Femoral Head in a Patient with Behcet's Disease" (2) and for her nice contributions to the topic.
Avascular necrosis of the femoral head (ANFH) is a generally refractory disease of clinical orthopedics and is common in middle-aged people.
Pedicle bone grafting versus transtrochanteric rotational osteotomy for avascular necrosis of the femoral head. J Bone Joint Surg [Br].
Applications include long bone non-unions, avascular necrosis of the femoral head, severe clavicle non-unions, cartilage regeneration, chondrogenesis and soft tissue repair of the shoulder, chronic tendonopathy, tendon ruptures as well as numerous applications to common, often difficult foot & ankle injuries and wrists fractures.
Diagnosis is usually made based on the clinical background and the radiological images including plain film, bone nuclear scan, and MRI in addition to excluding the other potential causes ofhip pain, especially avascular necrosis of the femoral head. MRI findings include diffuse bone marrow edema (BMED) involving the femoral head, neck, and sometimes the intertrochanteric area, and a small joint effusion is invariably present.2 Bone marrow edema (BMED) syndrome may be used instead of transient osteoporosis (TO), where osteopenia could never be documented, however the distinction based on osteopenia is somewhat arbitrary.