assimilate

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Synonyms for assimilate

Synonyms for assimilate

to take in and incorporate, especially mentally

Synonyms for assimilate

take up mentally

become similar to one's environment

make similar

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take (gas, light or heat) into a solution

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become similar in sound

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References in periodicals archive ?
The mean and the standard deviation of Assimilators in the homogeneous group were 62.
In this study, Data analysis indicated high school boys students' were mostly assimilators and divergers followed by convergers and accommodators.
An assimilator will prefer to work through an assignment requiring the construction of a model--for example, asking them to design a comprehensive master budget for a hypothetical service or manufacturing company (abstract conceptualization) and come up with relevant financial and operating budgets (reflective observation).
For example, the first odds ratio in the Table is calculated as the ratio of African American Assimilators (n = 29) to African American non-Assimilators (n = 30) multiplied by the ratio of non-African American non-Assimilators (n = 210) to the number of Assimilators who are not African American (n = 80).
Assimilators are strong in abstract conceptualization and reflective observation, while accommodators are strong in concrete experience and active experimentation (Kolb, 1976).
The Big 5 factors are extraversion, neuroticism, openness, agreeableness and conscientiousness, whereas Kolb Learning Styles are divergers, assimilators, convergers, and accommodators.
Assimilators usually show a higher degree of anxiety than those preferring Integration, but they are also agreeable (sociable), friendly, and not aggressive.
Assimilators conceptualize in abstract and undertake reflective observation.
Research based on a small private university in Istanbul found that the percentages of undergraduate students examined by Kolb's Learning Style Inventory listed in rank order from most to least were convergers first, assimilators second, accommodators and divergers (almost equal percentages) last.
Simpson and Du also noted that Assimilators made the fewest posts to online forums, while Convergers made the most.
Other approaches to cultural training are cross cultural assimilators (Bhawuk, 2001), total immersion in the host culture and language prior to beginning the new assignment (Pires & Stanton, 2000, 2005), and various global leadership development programs.
In addition to the experiential learning cycle, Kolb (2007) developed a learning style inventory dividing learners into four categories: accommodators, assimilators, convergers and divergers.
Molisak (Warsaw, 2006), while works of well-known Jewish artists, such as Bruno Schulz, or those written by assimilators, such as Julian Tuwim or Antoni Slonimski, have frequently been analyzed by many scholars.
A multimethod study of culture-specific, culture-general, and culture theory-based assimilators.
From this, Kolb identified 4 different learning styles--divergers, assimilators, convergers, and accommodators.