asseverate

(redirected from asseverates)
Also found in: Dictionary, Legal.
Graphic Thesaurus  🔍
Display ON
Animation ON
Legend
Synonym
Antonym
Related
  • verb

Synonyms for asseverate

to put into words positively and with conviction

Synonyms for asseverate

References in periodicals archive ?
Actually, the critical one, since observations asseverate it.
In the email above, Corrie passionately asseverates a belief that acts of violence spring from experiences of subjection and degradation; she notes in particular, with a peculiarly lyrical expression, the injustice of those who are compelled to live 'with their children in a shrinking place'.
In a similar simplification based on an unsubstantiated assumption of the author's uninflected conservatism, Joseba Gabilondo asseverates that Pardo Bazan "holds Carlist beliefs and, therefore, upholds the reactionary ideology that Spanish nationalism developed during the Restoration" (255).
Especially noteworthy, he asseverates explicitly that "Contraries are not mixed" (my emphasis).
They are thus vehicles by which Hemingway asseverates his own identity as the very template for masculine identity itself--a self-constructive practice, I would add, that shapes all his subsequent novels.
Of avant-garde writers, Gass asseverates, "each wishes to instruct us in the art of narration, the myth-making imagination.
64) Volokh asseverates that "the justification clause may aid construction of the operative clause but may not trump the meaning of the operative clause: To the extent the operative clause is ambiguous, the justification clause may inform our interpretation of it, but the justification clause can't take away what the operative clause provides.
He further asseverates that Golyadkin's double is "highly esteemed by right-thinking people," that he is "of a lively and pleasant disposition, is making good progress in his employment as well as among all people of sound judgment, is true to his word and to friendship and does not insult behind their backs those with whom he finds himself on amicable terms to their faces" (224).
But Storr's elision of Krauss and Bois is hardly surprising, given his own avowed hostility to "theory," not to mention "formalism," which he asseverates on page after page of the catalogue.