ash

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Synonyms for ash

ashes

Synonyms for ash

References in classic literature ?
Again the ashes slipped and crumbled; some stones rolled down, and fell with a dull, heavy sound upon the ground below.
If you apply wood ashes without a soil test, it is possible to ruin soil in just one year.
People can scattering ashes on private property in all 50 states.
On Tuesday, as he prepared for today's observances, Radecki held up the small silver cup that's contains the ashes he will use.
I considered running for it, a mad dash for ashes with Jamilet on my hip, but this seemed to lack a certain solemnity, so I decided against it.
Funeral directors have scatterers they can call on to perform the duty, or clergy get involved if ashes are scattered or buried in a grave yard.
The ashes are offered in a temporary container unless you've already chosen a permanent one, such as an urn.
Field-grown ashes can be beautiful," he says, "but in maturity, as limbs are lost, they often develop an ungainly appearance, as if they can't decide in which direction to invest new growth.
has introduced a technology that transforms cremation ashes into a growing medium to nurture a plant or tree into a living memorial.
2] binding in natural open-air conditions were carried out using circulating fluidized-bed combustion ashes (CFBCA), pulverized firing ashes (PFA) and their 1 : 1 mixture (Table 1).
This sacred sign was so attractive that even those who were not in a state of serious sin began to ask for ashes on the Wednesday before Lent.
The box was turned over to the Police Department, and Tate launched a search for relatives willing to take the unclaimed ashes.
While most European ashes have a pale cream-colored heartwood, "olive" ash is heartwood which is brown or black and produces a highly decorative figure that is prized for veneers.
The Minoan civilization of ancient Crete literally rose from the ashes, accoding to new evidence.