articulate

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Synonyms for articulate

Synonyms for articulate

produced by the voice

fluently persuasive and forceful

to produce or make (speech sounds)

to make into a whole by joining a system of parts

Synonyms for articulate

References in periodicals archive ?
Prior to Missouri's amendment to its constitutional search and seizure provision, law enforcement was permitted under the SCA's [section] 2703(c) to obtain real-time CSLI on issuance of a warrant supported by the lesser standard of "specific and articulable facts" that the communication was relevant to an ongoing criminal investigation.
The USA PATRIOT Act eliminated the "specific and articulable facts" requirement, but in 2005, Congress reintroduced a requirement that the government provide a statement of facts establishing "reasonable ground to believe that the tangible things" to be obtained were "relevant to an authorized investigation (other than a threat assessment).
92) Although the Third Circuit has treated historical cell site data similarly to how the Fifth Circuit has in allowing the "specific and articulable facts" standard to govern the disclosure of the information, because the magistrate judge asserted that a cell phone can act like a tracking device to disclose movement and location information, the court devoted substantial analysis to doubting this assertion.
application include "specific and articulable facts"
The FISC orders under which the telephony metadata program has operated have generally permitted searching the database for a particular number only if it can be demonstrated that there are facts giving rise to a reasonable articulable suspicion (RAS) that the telephone number in question, referred to as the "seed," is associated with one of the foreign intelligence targets referenced in the court order.
Every search of the data, they insisted, requires "a reasonable and articulable suspicion and is strictly limited by the courts with oversight by the intelligence committees of both houses of Congress.
But we're not allowed to look at any of those, however, unless we have reasonable, articulable suspicion that those numbers are related to a known terrorist threat.
This suspicion is based on questioning of alienage alone and also involves specific articulable facts, such as particular characteristics or circumstances which the inspector can describe in words.
It would not protect journalists if the government could show a "significant and articulable harm to national security.
In its comments, ACA echoed DHS own recognition that the wider sharing of CFATS data with non-DHS personnel sets up a potential conflict with the requirements inherent in CFATS to closely protect the same data from disclosure to personnel who are not cleared for that information and who may not have an articulable need to know.
Police training already teaches officers to justify a stop with "specific, articulable facts and reasonable inferences there from," the language in the key Supreme Court decision Terry v.
36) He argued that permitting pretext stops based only on probable cause of the observed traffic violation would create the temptation to inappropriately use traffic stops as a means of investigating other violations for which there was no probable cause or articulable suspicion.
The Senate Intelligence Committee conducted a similar hearing in late September at which Feinstein said proposals included putting limits on the NSA's phone metadata program, prohibiting collection of the content of phone calls, and legally requiring that intelligence analysts have a "reasonable articulable suspicion" that a phone number was associated with terrorism in order to query the database.
The Senate Intelligence Committee conducted a similar hearing in September at which Feinstein said proposals included putting limits on the NSA's phone metadata program, prohibiting collection of the content of phone calls, and legally requiring that intelligence analysts have a "reasonable articulable suspicion" that a phone number was associated with terrorism in order to query the database.