arsenic


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Related to arsenic: arsenic trioxide, Arsenic poisoning
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  • noun

Synonyms for arsenic

a white powdered poisonous trioxide of arsenic

References in periodicals archive ?
The award recipients from stage 1 of the arsenic sensor prize competition are: Natalie Cookson, President of Quantitative Biosciences, Inc.
She says, "It will be small and cheap enough to deploy many units to enable mapping of real-time arsenic concentrations.
Data analysis revealed that overall 14 percent water samples were identified unsafe due to higher arsenic concentration in Punjab Province whereas 16 percent in Sindh when compared with World Health Organization (WHO) guideline values of arsenic in drinking water (10ppb).
Arsenic is not geologically uncommon and occurs in natural water as arsenate and arsenite.
Arsenic concentrations in foods are highly variable, and regulatory limits have not yet been established.
In the new study, the researchers incorporated data on arsenic levels in drinking water and rice in the United States into the Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation (SHEDS) model, (10) which was developed by the EPA to estimate people's everyday chemical exposures.
Keywords: Compost, Total arsenic, Inorganic arsenic, As(III), ICP-MS, Leachate, Mobility.
Ground water arsenic hazard is world wide recognized problem which is reported in various parts of the world (Nickson, 1998; Polya, 2008; 2010; Rahman, 1996; Rahman, 2009; Sengupta, 2003; Smedley, 2002).
In addition, arsenic has been used as an additive to chicken and pig feed to promote growth.
The scale of the problem of arsenic poisoning is illustrated by the frequently used term Mass Poisoning.
Human acquaintance with arsenic goes back more than 2,000 years, when the ancient Greek, Chinese and Egyptian civilizations independently identified two minerals that became known as orpiment and realgar.
Arsenic has been identified as a potent human carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (2004).
Today, arsenic poisoning occurs through industrial exposure, from contaminated wine or moonshine, or because of malicious intent.
Arsenic is a hazardous, naturally occurring element in the earth.
Arsenic is a human toxin and it is affecting more than 150 million people around the world due to elevated levels in water [1].